ANTI-OPPRESSION (101) WORKSHOPS

This is a working model (in a much condensed form)  for anti-oppression workshops being developed by MINORITY WOMEN IN ACTION (MWA) and MOYO WA AFRIKA (MOYO).

The workshops address the myriad of social oppressions in a general manner; as well as delving more deeply into the colonial roots of systematic oppression, particularly homo and transphobia, in the African context.

I’m sharing the outline, on this matrix, because I’m looking for folks interested in helping us develop the workshop itself and the training module for facilitators/peer educators. We have set up an advisory committee that will provide feedback and mentorship for the program’s implementation. We are currently recruiting (more) individual activists and relevant organisations to join this committee. Any suggestions?

The program is scheduled to launch in Nairobi in January 2010. If you have resources that you think would be relevant and useful, email me….

Section 1.      (Unpacking) Anti-Oppression (101)

  1. Unpacking (Anti) Oppression
  2. S.O-G.I : Sexual Orientation vs. Gender Identity
  3. Homophobia, Transphobia & Heterosexism
  4. Anti-indigenous oppression 

Section 2:      Colonial Roots of Systemic Oppression

  1. Interrogating the intersections of our diversity
  2. On violence & hate crimes: state sponsored violence
  3. R3: repudiation, reparation, repatriation

Section 3:      Anti-Oppression Models

  1. How (do) we do anti-oppression work?
  2. Tools for challenging homophobia & transphobia
  3. Legal frameworks: supportive treaty bodies & hr mechanisms

Section 4:      Decolonization Methodologies

  1. The Need for Decolonization
  2. OUR-stories: queer & trans positive (pan) afrikan cultures
  3. A  Note on reclaimed language

Section 5:      Integration of Knowledge

  1. Mapping Struggles for Social Justice
  2. Positive Space Campaign

Section 6:      Service Providers Toolkit

  1. Fact sheets
  2. Recommended readings & web resources
  3. Positive Space Campaign
  4. GALCK & Moyo brochures

Section 7:      Wrap-up

  1. Personal stories
  2. Q&A
  3. Feedback Forms

 

SECTION 1

(Unpacking) Anti-Oppression (101)

 1. Unpacking (ANTI) oppression: interrogating the intersections of our diversity

2. Sexuality: global perspectives

#Sexual orientation/Gender Identity: breaking down HLGBTTIQQ

3.       Homo/Lesbo/Bi/Trans-phobia: definitions & variations

#Hetero-sexism & Hetero-normativity: hegemonic ideologies in praxis

4.       Anti-Indigenous Oppression:

#Marginalisation of indigenous religions: religious fundamentalism vs. ?

 

 A.    (anti) OPPRESSION

We ask participants to name, define and give examples of the different types of oppressions. We distinguish between interpersonal and systematic oppression, giving examples of each.

Together we come up with a complete list inclusive of classism, sexism/misogny, homo/transphobia and heterosexism, ableism, racism, oppression along religious lines, as well as anti-Indigenous and colonial oppression.

(FOR EXAMPLE…) Racism:

-define various types: cultural/internalised & systemic/institutionalised racism

-how racism is perpetuated

-stereotypes & how they affect us

-Race: A Human Invention

 
*Interactive exercises: Line in the Sand Game

*Toolkit resources:

              Fact sheets that include all forms of oppression,

              and provides space for participant notes.

              Definitions & ‘Un’-learning

             Deconstructing language/rationalisation of (different forms of) domination

   

B.     S.O-G.I

We ask participants to name and define sexual orientations, including the different ways that people are attracted to each other.

Together, we explore the differences between sex & gender, and define gender identity, including the differences and intersections between sexual orientation & gender identity

 

 C.           HOMO/ TRANSPHOBIA and HETEROSEXISM

We ask participants to name and define the difference between sex & gender, sexual orientation & gender identity, giving definitions of HTLGBTTIQQ people.

Together, we come up with a comprehensive list of stereotypes, prejudices, and identities.

Homo and Transphobia are explored in a more in depth manner, with the different types being named and examples being given of each.

 

Interactive Exercises:

‘The Porcupine’ – participants brainstorm on stereotypes/prejudices about LGBTTIQ people

 

Toolkit resources:
*A fact sheet is provided for homo/Transphobia, heterosexiam and heteronormativity

 *Gender & Sexuality: The Politics of Transformation

 

 

 Section 2

COLONIAL ROOTS OF SYSTEMATIC OPPRESSION

 

1. Interrogating the Intersections of Our Diversity

 We ask participants to discuss the connections between systematic oppressions and what they feel might be the origins of these.

We make the links through a diagram and then provide a historical run-down of colonial history and tie in all the various forms of oppression. 

*A timeline/fact sheet is provided for this.

A brief question/answer and discussion is opened up.

 

2.       Violence & Hate Crimes

We explore and link historical and sustained forms of violence against marginalised groups and identities.

 

Section  3.

ANTI-OPPRESSION MODELS

 A.     HOW DO WE DO ANTI-OPPRESSION WORK?

We ask participants to discuss and suggest ways that oppression and the roots of oppression can be addressed/combatted.

We discuss conventional anti-oppression models.

B.      ANTI-HOMO/TRANSPHOBIA MODELS

 Tools for challenging homophobia & transpĥobia are discussed in length

C.      LEGAL FRAMEWORKS

 We discuss supportive treaty bodies and human rights mechanisms

 

 Section  4.

DECOLONIZATION METHODOLOGIES

A. THE NEED FOR DECOLONIZATION

We discuss decolonization as a necessary first step in anti-oppression work, explore ways to reclaim indigenous (particularly African) knowledge, economies, self-determination, resources and dignity. We provide stories/examples of traditional/indigenous African societies that were/are anti-oppressive in various ways.  

*A reading list with key quotations is provided to help start participants in their own research.

 

B.    OUR-Stories: AFRICAN QUEER POSITIVITY

 

We highlight ‘queer-positive’ African traditions.

 

*Interactive Component: QTYAC introduction en NOR stories

* Tool Kit Resources: Case Study: afrikan herstory research project (rahp)

 

C. A Note on Reclaimed Language: Kuchu/Shoga

 

Section  5.

INTEGRATION OF KNOWLEDGE

We discuss specific ways that people (participants in particular) can integrate these models and visions into their work.

We discuss how to employ anti-oppression, particularly anti-homo/transphobia, as well as decolonization frameworks in the everyday.

Participants given chance to discuss their work context, give their own ideas, and get feedback from facilitators and group.

A. MAPPING STRUGGLES FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE

We explore the links among progressive social movements from a herstorical perspective.

B.  POSITIVE SPACE CAMPAIGN

Particular focus on African/decolonized models for queer-positive work. 

 

Section 6

SERVICE PROVIDER TOOLKIT

1.  Fact sheets

2. recommended readings & web resources

3. Positive Space Campaign

4. GALCK & Moyo brochures

 

Section 7

Wrap-up 

  1. Personal stories

Facilitators tell their personal stories of challenging oppression

      2.   Q&A

Participants write their questions for facilitators: anonymous 

      3.  Feedback Forms

Participants fill in assessment forms.