Hadithi? Hadithi?

In the beginning, is too far away to start from…..but in keeping with ‘easter’ traditions, where better to turn to than the ‘original’ bible,

 1.     To everything there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven:

2.     A time to be born, and a time to die; a time to plant, and a time to pluck that which is planted;

3.     A time to kill, and a time to heal; a time to break down, and a time to build up;

4.     A time to weep, and a time to laugh; a time to mourn, and a time to dance;

5.     A time to cast away stones, and a time to gather stones together; a time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing.

6.     A time to get, and a time to lose; a time to keep, and a time to cast away;

7.     A time to rend, and a time to sew; a time to keep silence, and a time to speak;

8.     A time to love, and a time to hate; a time of war, and a time of peace.

Ecclesiastes 3: 1-8

blogger’s note: like this series, the chosen quotes are relevant because they’re not new. So, if nothing is new under this sun….it doesn’t matter who said these words or where they were written. The sentiments are nothing more or less than afrikan feminist principles indelibly re/marked in/to every grand monument we have of our ‘progress’….en where better to continue looking than in our own backyard/s?

we’re doing it like makmende coz makmende is bigger than the past, bigger than yo’ mama(‘s) stories.

Osa Otura asks what is ‘truth’ I ask what is truth?. Truth is the word that cannot fall.

Orunmila says truth is the Lord of Heaven who guides the world rightly.

Osa Otura asks what is ‘truth’ I ask what is truth?

Orunmila says truth is the Unseen One guiding the world in the right way. The wisdom that Olodumare uses, great wisdom, abundant wisdom.

Osa Otura asks what is ‘truth’ I ask what is truth?

Orunmila says truth is the nature of Olodumare

ESE IFA, OSA OTURA

Hadithi? Hadithi?

Nilipotoka zaria, nilienda baharini kuongea na Olokun…naye akanichukua ayiti, nipe mji!

we (re)introduce the holy trinity of the Q werd…these, (Our) stories of wo/myn, you probably already knew, (en if you didn’t well then now you know that these hadithi) are derived from indigenus myths of divinities like Asiis, Fatima, Mumbi, Nambi, Nomkhulwana, among millions of other legends that have walked…

queen of stars

Yemoja (Iemanja Yemaja, Imanja, Yemayá, Jemanja, Yemalla, Yemana, Yemanja, Yemaya, Yemayah, Yemoja, Ymoja, Nanã, La Sirène, LaSiren, Mami Wata) – divine mother

la siren-e

Yemoja is the “Mother of the Children of Fishes.” As such, she is the penultimate symbol of motherhood. Yemoja is the all encompassing mother; like the sea, her ability to nurture is vast. Though associated with the ocean in the African Diaspora, in Yorubaland, Yemoja is the Orisa of the Ogun river. Yemoja is associated with the top layers of the ocean- Olokun is considered the deep, deep realm of the Ocean. The Ocean is the largest environment for life on the earth, therefore Yemoja is viewed as the mother who gave birth to civilization and who continues to sustain us. 

nomkhulwana

of the most high

Oshun is the Orisa associated with fresh water. The name Oshun translates to mean “spring” or “source.” As the Orisa of fresh water, Oshun is the source of all life. She is the owner of the Osun river in Oshogbo, Nigeria. She is a powerful healer, especially as it concerns to issues of conception, women’s health and love relationships. Oshun is a great diviner and is said to own sixteen cowrie divination. Oshun is the champion of women and protector of mothers. Like the river, this Orisa has many faces. As it is said, “the river is calm, but it also rages.”  Oshun is the spark of creation; she is abundance and joy and reminds us that we are meant to have abundance, joy and love in our lives.

Oya is the complex Orisha who guides transformation and change in life.  As the Goddess of the Winds, she can come as a fierce tornado or hurricane or as a cool breeze on a hot summer day.  In her transformative mode she is always moving toward ideal justice for all.  She wants the best for each of us, and sometimes that means taking away our illusions about the world regarding things and people.  Oya is also known as the keeper of the Ancestors.  In this capacity she serves as the guardian of Egun (Ancestors) at the outskirts of the cemetery, serving as mediator between the living and the sacred dead.  There is a Yoruba prayer for Oya that says, “ Ajalaiye, Ajalorun, fun mi ire,” translated as “the winds of Earth and Heaven bring me good fortune.”  She moves heaven (ancestors) and earth (living) to create communication between the realms.  Finally, as Patron of the Marketplace, Oya is a shrewd businesswoman who reigns over commerce and exchange.  Invoke her before you go shopping.  Take an offering to her and leave it at the opening to a flea market, and she will smile upon your bargaining.  She is also called Iyansan (The Mother of Nine), particularly in Brazil.  Her number is nine, and she loves eggplants and red wine.  Oya- Iyansan is a complex warrior deity who will go to battle for her children out of love and justice…….

en makmende hepad all of them en went for nana buluku instead……

 to be continued.