Press Statement: Reposted from Bredrin and Sistas in Solidarity

Uganda: Parliament Should Reject Anti-Homosexuality Bill

16th February 2012

On Tuesday 7th February 2012, the Anti-Homosexuality Bill (2009) was reintroduced to the Parliament of Uganda. If passed, this draft legislation would violate the human rights of all Ugandans, and should immediately be dropped, the East and Horn of Africa Human Rights Defenders Project (EHAHRDP), Foundation for Human Rights Initiative (FHRI), The Human Rights Centre Uganda (HRCU), and Human Rights Network-Uganda (HURINET) said today.

Hon. David Bahati’s widely condemned private member’s bill is one of ten bills saved and reintroduced from the previous Parliament. The bill had its first reading on 7th February 2012 and was referred to the Legal and Parliamentary Affairs Committee for scrutiny. It is understood that the bill was re-tabled in its original form but that amendments recommended by the Committee last year will be incorporated.

Although Hon. Bahati is reported in the media to have said that the death penalty for ‘serial’ acts of homosexuality will be dropped, this is not yet confirmed.

EHAHRDP, FHRI, HRCU and HURINET express their concern at the lack of clarity surrounding the parliamentary process and contents of the bill, and call on Parliament to clarify on this matter.

EHAHRDP, FHRI, HRCU and HURINET recall the submission by the Uganda Human Rights Commission in its 2010 annual report that “some of the provisions in the bill are unnecessary, and that most of them violate international human rights standards.” The rejection of certain international standards envisaged in the 2009 bill sets a dangerous precedent regarding Uganda’s respect for the human rights commitments it has made.

The bill contains harsh provisions which would seriously restrict the rights to freedom of expression, association and assembly and would threaten the ability of some human rights organisations to continue operating. Already, on 14th February the Minister of State for Ethics and Integrity,

Hon. Rev. Fr. Lokodo Simon, ordered the unconstitutional shutdown of a capacity-building workshop organized by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) human rights defenders in Entebbe. The bill and such actions by government representatives reinforce the more general threats to civil society space in Uganda, such as the onerous regulation of public meetings and discussions sought to be introduced with the Public Order Management Bill.

As well as threatening the safety of LGBTI people generally, the Anti-Homosexuality Bill also jeopardizes the security of human rights defenders working on these issues. The re-tabling of the bill just days after the first anniversary of the murder of LGBTI activist and EHAHRDP founding member, David Kato, is a stark reminder of the insecurity this bill has already caused in Uganda.

More generally, the bill would have a wide-reaching and disturbing effect on the freedoms of the majority of Ugandans. If health professionals, spiritual leaders, teachers, business people, landlords, and many others in positions built upon trust and confidentiality fail to disclose to the authorities persons they suspect of being homosexual, under the provisions of this bill would also be targeted for prosecution themselves.

EHAHRDP, FHRI, HRCU and HURINET welcome the statement issued by the Minister of State for Ethics and Integrity on Wednesday 8th February that the bill “does not enjoy the support of the Prime Minister or the Cabinet.” We call on the authorities to ensure the physical safety of LGBTI community members and human rights activists and fulfill the commitment made by Uganda during the Universal Periodic Review in October 2011 to “take immediate concrete steps to stop discrimination and assaults against LGBT persons.”

EHAHRDP, FHRI, HRCU and HURINET call on the Members of Parliament, and all Ugandans, to reject this discriminatory and divisive bill and refuse to be distracted from the real pressing issues facing the country at this time, such as the debate over the exploitation of Uganda’s oil resources.

For more information, please contact:

Hassan Shire, Executive Director, East and Horn of Africa Human Rights Defenders Project, on

executive@defenddefenders.org or

+256 772 753 753

Livingstone Sewanyana, Executive Director, Foundation for Human Rights Initiative, on

fhri@dmail.ug or

+256 414 510 263/498

Margaret Sekaggya, Executive Director, The Human Rights Centre Uganda, on

hrcug@hrcug.org or

+256 414 266 186

Mohammed Ndifuna, Chief Executive Officer, Human Rights Network-Uganda, on

executive@hurinet.or.ug or

PRESS RELEASE: COALITION OF AFRICAN LESBIANS (CAL) CONDEMNS MINISTERS’S CLOSURE OF LGBT WORKSHOP IN KAMPALA

======================================================

Boksburg, South Africa

February 15, 2012

The Coalition of African Lesbians (CAL) Condemns the Ugandan Government Closing of an LGBT Capacity Building Workshop in Kampala, on February 13, 2012

**Human Rights Defenders Kasha Jacqueline Nabagesera and Vanja Braathem Escape Arrest**

The Coalition of African Lesbians (CAL), a coalition of lesbians, bisexual women and trans-divers organizations and individuals, condemns the orders of the State Minister of Ethics and Integrity, Hon. Simon Lukodo to close an LGBT Leadership Training workshop on the morning of Tuesday, February 14, 2012.

Furthermore, the coalition condemns the outright intimidation by government officials of the two organizers of this workshop, Human Rights Defenders Kasha Jacqueline Nabagesera and Vanja Braathem. The week-long workshop was due to end tomorrow, February 15, 2012.

Such actions are in direct contravention of the Constitution of Uganda, The African Charter on Human and People’s Rights and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, amongst other international human rights instruments, all of which strongly promote and protect the rights to freedom of association, assembly, speech, expression and the right to information of all citizens and human beings, without discrimination.

In the middle of the Parliament review of the Anti-Homosexuality Bill, The Coalition of African Lesbians strongly demands that the Government of Uganda protects all LGBT people in Uganda, particularly known and targeted LGBT Human Rights Defenders. It is the responsibility of the government to ensure safety for all who live within its borders.

Background:
Activists report that in the morning of February 14, 2012, a government official claiming to belong to the President’s Office walked into the workshop room and sat down. With concern, one of the organizers, Kasha Jacqueline Nabagesera, asked him to move out as he was uninvited to the workshop. The official asked Kasha to follow him to a spot in the hotel. Upon entering that room with him, Kasha met with the Minister and his aides. The Minister demanded to know the purpose of the workshop and Kasha responded that it was about leadership. He further demanded to know what kind of leadership the workshop was addressing and again, Kasha responded to his inquiry. The Minister then asked Kasha to come with him to the workshop room where he began to speak to the participants directly. At that point, the Minister announced that the workshop was illegal and unethical and ordered its closure. There was resistance from the workshop organizers and participants and as a result, the Minister ordered for the arrest of Kasha. Fortunately, Kasha was able to sneak out and run. On reaching her room, the hotel staff called Kasha to inform her that the Minister and police were waiting for her at the hotel lobby. Kasha managed to sneak out of her room and escaped by jumping over the hotel fence. The hotel manager is reported to have been put under gun point to produce Kasha and the Minister left an order for both Kasha and Vanja to leave the country as they are not needed in Uganda. According to further reports from activists, Kasha was summoned by the office of the Minister yesterday afternoon to explain more about the purpose of the workshop which she declined to do for safety reasons. The rest of the participants checked out of their rooms, amidst officials searching for Kasha on every floor of the hotel, and returned safely to their homes. Eight days after the Anti-Homosexuality Bill has been re-tabled, the general sense among LGBT people is that of fear and hopelessness.

For more information please contact;

Kasha Jacqueline Nabagesera
Executive Director
Freedom and Roam Uganda
Tel: +256 772 463161
Email: jnkasha@gmail.com

Moses Kimbugwe
Programs Coordinator
Spectrum Uganda Initiatives
Tel: +256 782 854 391
Email: manyagwa2000@yahoo.com

Victor Mukasa
Advocacy Adviser for East Africa
Coalition of African Lesbians
Tel: +27 11 918 2182
Mobile: +27 78 436 3635
Email: victor@cal.org.za

Pamoja Tutafika! Je, huu ni ungwana?

Pamoja Tutafika!

RESIST, REJECT, OPPOSE THE ANTI-HOMOSEXUALITY BILL 2009 CURRENTLY TABLED IN THE UGANDA PARLIAMENT

 (Please circulate to all your Afrikan contacts)

 The COALITION OF AFRICAN LESBIANS (CAL), a pan African network of lesbian, bisexual and gender non-conforming people, organizations and individuals, calls upon every person who believes in the dignity, equality and freedom of every human being, to take note of and act urgently to halt the Anti-Homosexuality Bill which has just been re – tabled in Uganda.  We look to African human rights activists and defenders, politicians, religious leaders, cultural leaders, scholars, lawyers, medical professionals, educators, parents and all human rights respecting and promoting individuals and institutions, to take such urgent action.

The draconian Bill was re-tabled in the Parliament of Uganda by Member of Parliament, David Bahati, on February 7, 2012. The Bill had its first reading and was referred to the Legal and Parliamentary Affairs Committee for scrutiny. The Committee is expected to examine it and conduct public hearings, and then it will report back to the House for a formal debate on the Bill.

 

Background:

The Anti-Homosexuality Bill 2009 was first introduced in the Parliament of Uganda by Member of Parliament, David Bahati, as a Private Member’s Bill in October, 2009. The Bill proposes severe prison sentences, and in some cases the death penalty. It states that anyone who commits the offence of homosexuality will be liable to life imprisonment as the provisions, according to the Bill, are meant to “protect the traditional family by prohibiting any form of sexual relations between persons of the same sex.” The Bill further states that “aggravated homosexuality” will be punished by death as it aims to ban all forms of expression advocating for homosexuality. It would also be an offence for a person who is aware of any violations of the Bill’s provisions not to report them to the authorities within 24 hours. Furthermore, the Bill proposes to criminalize the “promotion of homosexuality” which is a provision targeting civil society and human rights defenders. These and other provisions of the Bill go beyond targeting homosexuals, to affect families, human rights defenders, teachers, neighbors, friends, spiritual leaders, medical professionals, shop owners, to mention but a few.

 

Stand out and up against the Anti-Homosexuality Bill 2009 NOW. We have limited time. Resist this unconstitutional bill and take on one, some or all of the following actions;

1.       Pass on this Call to Action to as many concerned Africans as you can and urge them to take action.

 

2.       Write emails to and or call Ugandan Members of Parliament (MPs) urging them to resist and reject the Bill in its entirety because it is anti-human rights and affects every Ugandan in different ways. The full list of all 386 MPs can be found athttp://www.parliament.go.ug/mpdata/mps.hei Click on the MP’s name and you will get their email address and phone number.  The MPs can also be contacted through social media such as Facebook. Just search for their name on Facebook and or Twitter.

 

3.       Write to the President of Uganda, H.E. Yoweri Kaguta Museveni and urge him to reject this draconian proposed Bill in its entirety. Urge him to discourage further debate and consideration of the Bill by Parliament and to decline to sign this unconstitutional Bils into law. (Contacts below)

 

4.       Write, call or fax the Inspector General of Police in Uganda, Major General Kale Kaihura, and urge him to ensure the protection of the human rights of all lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in Uganda and those who defend LGBT people. This includes protection from both state and non-state actors who have started to take the law in their hands by harassing and violating LGBT Ugandans. (Contacts below)

 

5.       Write, fax and or call the Minister of Justice in Uganda, Hon. Major General Kahinda Otafire,   and the State Minister of Justice Hon. Fred Ruhindi and urge them to speak out against the unconstitutionality of the Anti-Homosexuality Bill 2009 and to discourage any further debate on the Bill. (Contacts below)

6.       Write to the Minister of Health in Uganda, Hon. Dr. Christine Ondoa and bring to her attention the implications of this Bill on the fight against HIV/AIDS and on access to medical services by LGBT citizens. (Contacts below)

 

7.       Write to the Cardinal of Uganda, His Eminence Emmanuel Wamala, and the Arch Bishop of the Church of Uganda , The Most Revd Henry Luke Orombi and urge them to stand out and up and oppose the Bill in its entirety. Tell them that homosexuals need their protection. Point out, to the Cardinal of the Catholic Church, the Catechism of the Catholic Church which says in Article 6, 2358: The number of men and women who have deep-seated homosexual tendencies is not negligible. This inclination, which is objectively disordered, constitutes for most of them a trial. They must be accepted with respect, compassion, and sensitivity. Every sign of unjust discrimination in their regard should be avoided. These persons are called to fulfill God’s will in their lives and, if they are Christians, to unite to the sacrifice of the Lord’s Cross the difficulties they may encounter from their condition. They are called to protect and not to remain silent amidst injustice and discrimination. (Contacts below)

 

8. Write, call, fax your Minister of Foreign Affairs and urge him/her to put pressure on the Government of Uganda against the further debating of the unconstitutional Anti-Homosexuality Bill 2009.

 

For more information, please contact;

Victor Mukasa

Advocacy Advisor for East Africa

Coalition of African Lesbians

Tel: +27 11 918 2182

Mobile: +27 78 436 3635

Email: victor@cal.org.za

 

Fikile Vilakazi

Programs Director

Coalition of African Lesbians

Tel: +27 11 918 2182

Email: fikile@cal.org.za

 

===============================================================================================================================

 

ACTION CONTACTS:

 

The President of the Republic of Uganda

H.E. Yoweri Kaguta Museveni

Email: aak@statehouse.go.ug, cc: pps@statehouse.go.ug

 

The Inspector General of Police

Major-General Kale Kaihura

Tel: +256 414 258 114

Fax : +256 414 270 502

 

Minister of Justice and Constitutional Affairs

Hon Maj.Gen Kahinda Otafire

Email: mojca@africaonline.co.ug

Tel: +256-414- 230538

Fax: +256-414- 254829

 

State Minister of Justice

Hon. Fred Ruhindi

Email: fruhindi@parliament.go.ug

 

Minister of Health

Hon. Christine Ondoa

Tel: +256-414-340872

Mobile: +256772428346+256701428346

Fax: 256-41-4231584

Email: info@health.go.ug

 

The Cardinal of the Catholic Church

His Eminence Cardinal Emmanuel Wamala

Tel: +256 414 510389/510570/510544/510571

Fax: +256 41 510545

 

Archbishop of Uganda & and Bishop of Kampala

The Most Revd Henry Orombi

Email: abpcou@gmail.com

Tel: +256 414 270 218 / 9

Fax: +256 414 251 925

=============================================================================================

There’s a story I know bout how the spaces between de diaspora en Mama Afrika are bridged all de time by hadithi.

The hadithi we tell ourselves and others, they’re all we know…….few hours to a year filled with changing faces (in ever mo) quickly evolving spaces (lakini bado pole pole ndio mwendo) en I share with you a hadithi that was given to me in neo-colonial Afrikan style, a story I shared with others for the first time at a vigil last year in Tdot.

Dis story blessed by the elders, pulled from the internet, (but true say transcribed from the mouths of great granmas en griots) and approved with words of caution & mystery still.

A Muganda will never betray the secret of his, hir or her friend.

reminds me of the beginning of that powerful poem by Mukoma wa Ngugi. Recipe: How to become an immigrant and an exile.

Listen. Do you hear ghosts? Connect them to the sound of a canoe
on Indian Ocean. Listen to that tape of familiar beats that has weathered
foreign seasons. Sukus found in Salsa. Fela Kuti meets Masekela
in Appalachia. Do not inhale the coal fumes. Hold a memory……

Remember that hadithi? Listen..

THE STORY OF THE FAIRY FOXES

Hapo zamani za kale there was a King of Uganda who wanted to make a Zoo, and he called all his chiefs together and told them to bring animals of every kind from the forests and jungles and swamps

Then he planted a beautiful garden and put cages into it, and people came from all over the country to see it. But the animals were very miserable; night and day they thought of their homes, and they hated having food brought to them instead of hunting for it themselves, and they hated having water brought to them in water-pots instead of drinking it from the deep forest pools, but no one was sorry for them except the King’s dwarf, and he had lived in the jungle and knew their language.

One day when the King was walking in his Zoo and the dwarf was with him, he said:

“Am I not a great King? No one has ever made a Zoo like this before, in which all the animals of the country are collected together.” But the dwarf said:

“All the animals are not here; there is one animal which lives in the Mukono Forest which no chief has brought, because, though it cries all night and everyone hears it, no man has ever seen it. Some people say it is a bat, and some say it is a sloth, and some say it is a fairy fox with wings made of the night mists.”

When the King heard this he said:

“I will not be beaten by any animal; I will go to Mukono and fetch this fairy animal myself.” So he sent for Sekibobo the chief and told him to build a big encampment near the forest, and the men worked night and day till it was finished. Then the King and his whole court went to Mukono.

For three months the King lived in the encampment, and every night he went into the forest, but though he heard the fairy foxes crying all round him he never saw one. Sometimes the sound came from above his head, but there was nothing there; and sometimes it came from the ground at his feet, but there was nothing there; and sometimes to the right hand and sometimes to the left, but nothing was there; and the people called them “enjoga,” which means “bullies,” because they teased the King every night.

At last the time came to return to the capital, and the King sat sadly in his house, and the dwarf sat near him and said:

“Why is the King so sad?” And the King answered:

“I am sorry I have no fairy fox for my Zoo, but there is another reason. I have learnt to love the beautiful forests and jungles and the deep glades and shady paths and water pools, and the moonlight nights are never so lovely in the capital as they are in the country, and I am sad that I must leave it all and return.”

Then the dwarf said: “If you are so sad at leaving the country after only three months, how much more sad must the animals be, for this is their home, and in your wonderful Zoo they are only prisoners.”

#To David with Love

When the King heard that he was thoughtful and silent for some time, and then he called Sekibobo and said: “Send a messenger quickly to the capital and tell the Katikiro that all the animals in the Zoo are to be sent home, everyone to his own forest or jungle or swamp.” “I will have no more prisoners,” he said.

And now there is a broad road which goes from Kampala to Jinja and passes quite near to the Mukono Forest, and if you go there you will hear the “enjoga “crying in the forest all night, but no one has ever seen them. Some people say they are bats, and some say they are sloths, and some say they are fairy foxes with wings made of the night mists.

reposted from http://digital.library.upenn.edu/women/baskerville/king/king.html, via the healing orality of  Afrika.

You’ll never believe wot happened is always a great way to start……

There’s a story I know. It’s about de earth en how it floats in space on de back of a turtle. I’ve heard this story many times, and each someone tells the story, it changes. Sometimes the change is simply in the voice of de storyteller. Sometimes the change is in de details. Sometimes in de order of events. Other times it’s de dialogue or response of de audience. But in all the telling of the tellers, the world

 never leaves de turtle’s back. And de turtle never swims away.

[revised excerpts from] the truth about stories: a native narrative [according to] thomas king

[kama ni ukweli…..]

Consider these dreamscapes of using the arts for educational-paradigm shifts in harvesting Pan-Afrikan memories of legends like Audre Lorde, Makmende, Malcolm X, Mandela, Marcus Garvey na Mbuya Nehanda:

kwasababu [because]

when WE speak we are afraid
our words will not be heard            nor welcomed
but when we are silent         we are still afraid

So it is better to speak
remembering
we were never meant to survive

[in de spaces between: exploring how to not only reconcile but embrace queer/trans identities na (with) akina baba, mama na watoto WA– Afreeka]

    1. co-[re]create  (a tribute to those among us who carry the sage secrets of loving like) The Black Unicorn – in #Makmende Amerudi [with d’bi young.anitafrika en a map to the door of no return: notes on belonging – in dub ]

starring Ngozi Paul as  Britannia Zimeisha

[and Tsholo Khalema as Nneke Dumela in #theNekkydtruthis]….

(Not-so) long ago in a thriving learning village within a global matrix of farmers en soldiers of love, mo’ malaikas joined the pan-afrikan performing arts institute [in Cape Town] as artists-in-residence.

like [Check] dis’ sista we love, respekt en admire so…. ngozi paul is an actor, writer, director and executive producer, best known for her celebrated role of starr on the hit canadian show ‘da kink in my hair – a series which she co-created and executive produced. a true renaissance woman, ngozi is committed to telling universal stories through her tuned afrocentric perspective. her resolute commitment to telling ethnodiverse stories is apparent in the compelling body of work. ngozi has been named one of toronto’s ‘top ten actors’ by now magazine, and nominated for ‘best actress’ at u.k.’s black international film Festival for her powerful performance as susan in bayan. on the stage, ngozi is a proud recipient of stratford festival’s ‘tyrone guthrie award’. ngozi paul was an integral member of the original creative team of canada’s first black sitcom, lord have mercy!, which was nominated for two gemini awards including best comedic series. as the founder and president of ngozika productions, ngozi has created diverse content. ngozika productions is currently working on an innovative webbased series to be launched later this year and its debut feature film.

2.  Re-write (de hadithi of) Britannia zimeisha as “First mke (-si-mume)” [#nohomo] na Makmende as himself in (de mama of dis) ‘Amerudi’ series: where he is married to two of the Laydayz (na Godfrey) na Abscondita ni de fourth ‘mysterious’ wife aka. Fairy god sista [#notonthedownlow] in dis ‘big love(upendo)’ family

[herstory basi ni hadithi zetu….kama asili ya malaika, of gate-keepers na griots]

hadithi? hadithi? paukwa! pakawa! hadithi njoo…..

3.

Celebrate milestones in the growth of things like our love for each other, our families and back-to-Afreeka (is-the-future) movements.      [Hadithi kama…..Nakumbuka]

I remember when GALCK was officially launched in December 2008, still riding off the magic of moments-for-life like those, participating in en witnessing years of Under [en in the mainstream mis-reported/werd-on-the]- ground, rebuilding en teaching communities

Nakumbuka the touch of heaven shared with not only those that gathered to commemorate the birth of a queer/trans center of community work in the moyo wa[heart of] Nairobi but those that wished they were there and shared love en mo resources with US in the struggle for Afrikan liberation…for this en so much mo, I yam infinitely grateful.

4.     Take back de re-post.

It is clear that despite the fragmentation and marginalisation that modernity has imposed on the people of Africa, elements of Ubuntu still exist in African societies through languages, cultures and knowledge systems. Ubuntu seeks a restoration of balance in relations between individuals inter se and between individuals and nature. In the new situation in which the holistic individuals now find themselves united in solidarity – no longer alienated and isolated – they find Abantu in existence with elements of Ubuntu still with them. The holistic individuals find themselves already embedded in the culture of Ubuntu……

Such a new environment requires that in order to fit in the new combined human environment of interconnectedness and wholeness, such new combined individuals have to make their rules of a restorative society on an on-going basis.

Already academic researchers are beginning to examine this new situation by exploring the parallels between online social networking and the practices of ‘tribal’ societies that McLuhan envisaged. In the collective profile-surfing essential for ‘face-booking’ and ‘my-spacing’ in which they try to engage in ‘friending’, they begin to see the resurgence of ancient patterns of oral communication. ……

As Archbishop Desmond Tutu once declared about the philosophy of Ubuntu, which he called ‘this thing’:
‘Africans have this thing called Ubuntu…the essence of being human. It is part of the gift that Africans will give the world. It embraces hospitality, caring about others, willing to go the extra mile for the sake of others.
We believe a person is a person through another person, that my humanity is caught up, bound up and inextricable in yours. When I dehumanise you I inexorably dehumanise myself. The solitary individual is a contradiction in terms and, therefore, you seek to work for the common good because your humanity comes into its own community, in belonging.’…….
It is clear that the new society cannot reproduce a society that lived by the principles of Ubuntu for that was a qualitatively different society. But surely there are some lessons that can be learnt from that experience for the new society that those engaged in revolts seem to be demanding.
[ excerpts of The transformation of the global system and its IMPLICATIONS FOR AFRICA by Dani Wadada Nabudere http://www.pambazuka.org/en/category/features/72529 ]

#ukweli ni: there’s some times I feel mo’ like a lone wolf from a pack of [structurally] dysfunctional hybrids, seemingly isolated/marginalised…. yet always

because of ‘this ting called ubuntu’ that’s neva got me lonely in dis concrete jungle surrounded with the wealth of Bredrin en dadas, children en elders, healers, righteous teachers, warriors en lovers wherever I live, work en play in…..

Najua I ain’t jus lucky, I yam [en we are] blessed. For that en so much mo’ ai yam infinitely grateful for….

There’s a(nother) story I know. It’s about the earth and divine re/visions of rainbow nations in urban hubs na vijiji kama [villages like in]  Abuja, Addis Ababa, Brooklyn, Cape town, Cairo, Dar-es-salaam, Jo’burg, Kampala, Kigali, Kingston, Lagos, Nairobi, Rajasthan, Tdot, Tripoli [and wherever there are those spreading love, hope and positivity in abundance]……these are (some of) the  post-cards of Makmende’s adventures that I will remember tomorrow.

I was born when lizards were in ones and twos

colour spill productions: east side story

A child of Idemili. The difficult tear drops

Of sky’s weeping drew my spots. Being

Sky-born I walked the earth with royal gait

And mourners saw me coiled across their path.

But of late

A strange bell

Has been singing a song of desolation:

Leave your yams and cocoyams

And come to school.

And I must run away in haste

When children in play or in earnest cry:

Look! A Christian is on the way……

[read Travels of alice in wonderland:upside-down]

…beside/s the sorrow of the solitary voice that now wailed after them they might have been returning with a bride. The sweet agony of the solitary singer settled like dew on the head.

Dis hadithi is about ‘IT’, for the purposes of dis blog (story/teller) ‘IT’

[revised excerpts  ya Arrow of God by Chinua Achebe]


is the tangled web of realities that transform (not only) my perspectives on waiting for superman, the politrix of diverse media on [david]kato’s trial, retreats en the pursuit of ‘rapture’ TO what comes next…

like a poem from d’bi young anitafrika’s epic dub archive….ancient concept…..

it all comes down to.. nothing less than UPENDO

that has me (en we)not only advocating for truth n reconciliation but co-creating epics of the hadithis of our lives with our learning villages

IT is what has had us rebelling in righteousness and rebuilding our homesteads from (long ago)

sharing all our resources to grow[ing] magical forests  en farm[ing] yams, pumpkins n herbs, multiply[ing] heads of goats en hens

retelling [ancient] poetry openly in diverse urban spaces [never confessing bush-rituals. But. dey plotting big time for return from exile o…..

[between the lines: we ask those tuff questions of remembering tradishun en paths of harvesting the powah! of our diversity,

only) TUKIFAFANUA the complexities of ‘every-night-till-the-newyamfeast’

(na)the urgency of security/interventions for LGBTIQ asylum seekers,

(na) the sacredness of  bredrin en sistrin/outsiders

IT is the spaces between silence, organising, and play(ing)with friends en families, praying (even) for blessings for  our enemies, and those who fight us…

IT is the struggle to maintain the abundance of well being and prosperity to blue sky and farm in the rurals,

source: sprbd.tumblr.com

Dreaming to Embark on a year long (artist-in-residence) retreat with (s)kin folk[s], finance [grassroots] organising with Bredrin and sistas in solidarity like   AfraKenya, Black Queer Resistance en The Brown Boi Project, Colour Me Dragg and FARUg , SMUG & T.I.TsUganda, Deviant & Goldelox productions,

massive human-positive en salaam coalitions and the people project[s] facilitating positive relearning en transformation at spaces like [moyo wa Afreeka] centres en women’s health in women’s hands,

IT is re/mapping the foundations of healing/schools without borders through [queer/Afrikan re-visions of en call outs for un]conferences like

Queer It Yourself – Tools for Survival

[read: how to become a professional queer –  in another place not here

Play: spot the remix/ed en indigenus….hold a memory..harvest pumpkins, yams en herbs]

As a part of the 2011 National Queer Arts Festival, “A Sustainable Queer Planet,” the Visual Arts Committee presents…….

QIY: A laboratory…envisioned as… [re]creating a sustainable queer culture and demonstrating the power of self and community organizing, co-creation, speculation, and transformation.

As an antidote to anti-sociality theories of queerness (that suggest queerness can only be rendered as a negation of heteronormativity), Queer It Yourself invites artists to forge their own tools for surviving the everyday challenges of contemporary queer existence…….

Queering the index….the various sections of the QIY exhibition include:

Land Use / Dig it (organic farming, community gardens, eco-projects, cruising sites, earthworks, recycling projects, rural gay culture, hippies and rednecks, RFD zine, Billy Club, 420 cultures, mountain men, off the grid living, survivalism, subsistence, indigenous and third world land use, border disputes)

Shelter / Sheltering (guides to urban and rural homemaking, urban and rural homelessness, cars, tents, bridges and freeway overhangs, tiny houses, pre-fab housing, visionary architecture, greening your living space, creating mood lighting with energy efficient fixtures, housing collectives, polyamorous living)

Craft Making / Queering it (queer arts and crafts, craft demos, how-to guides and workshops, how to use etsy.com, Blurb and self-publishing software, QIY kinky toys, homemade fashion and couture)

Commerce / Selling it (experiments with capitalism, fashion collectives, sexwork, alternative book,

art, and product distribution, queer & LGBT marketing demographics, critiques, small businesses, barter, trade, resource-based economy vs. commodity-based economy)

Community / Join in (political organizing, queer community organizing, ad hoc political action committees, queer pride, gay shame, organizing your first demonstration, social & political groups, leather clubs, s/m networks, biker gangs)

Nomadics / Roaming (the culture of the road, the runway, the superhighway, jetsetting, transnationalism, queer diasporas, queer immigrant and exile cultures)

C

kwetu

ommunications / Connecting (zines, homo-core

music, queer speed-dating, independent publishing, social networking, blogging, listserves, social media, flashmobs, promotional strategies, writing your first press release, street art, posters, stickers, queer graffiti)

Learning / Get Schooled (community art and culture projects, health activism, continuing education, grant writing and fundraising, guides for queer survival, mentorship, “training” in leather circles, drag “mothers”, informal or marginal methods of transmitting culture, service, apprenticeships)

Style / Working it (working the runway, drag king & queen culture, ball culture, leather, gear, street styles, rural styles, international styles, fashion and make-up tips and tricks, makeover demonstrations, finding the right photographer for your head-shot)

We welcome artwork, ephemera, documentation, publications, zines, music, videos, installations, DIY kits, guides, instruction manuals, maps, charts,

source:natural belle.tumblr.com

top-ten tips, alternative cosmologies, proposals for live demonstrations, workshops and interactive QIY workstations.

Propose a history of Zine culture, show work of collective art projects, show artifacts of ad hoc political action committees, give live demonstrations of quilting and queer homemaking, offer a do-it-yourself stencil-making so that you too can be a street artist, and much more…

[deadline to submit proposals passed but…If you have questions (say about funding for travel n accommodations or collaborating with grassroots networks),

please contact QIY@queerculturalcenter.org [and] uhai.eashri@gmail.com [pia]

todavidwithlove@gmail.com [na] check dis conference in another place, not here….mo’ wisdom circles in world cafes on the art of taking participatory leadership to scale]

UHAI-EASHRI is pleased to announce that the 3rd Regional Changing Faces, Changing Spaces Conference will be convened in Nairobi, Kenya from 4th to 6th May, 2011. This conference will bring together activists from the LGBTI and sex worker movements in East Africa, as well as health and legal professionals, human rights activists and organisations, and donor partners working in the Region (Uganda, Tanzania, Kenya, Burundi, Rwanda).
As such, UHAI is requesting participation, input and support from activists within the LGBTI and sex worker movements across the five countries. It is hoped that a representative team of activists will guide UHAI in developing the Conference agenda with the needs of the activist community in mind and in light of lessons learned from the 1st and 2nd Conferences.

This will require activist participants, working with the Conference Task Force, to volunteer time and their unique perspectives in helping this Conference meet the needs of all the stakeholders involved in UHAI. Further to this, the activist participants will be involved in crucial decision making regarding the logistics and organizing of this Conference. Therefore, we are seeking a maximum of 8 LGBTI and sex worker activists to volunteer a little of their time (hopefully not more than 5 hours per week in the run up to the Conference). Activist participants will need to have email and telephone access.

This is a great opportunity to shape the 3rd Changing Faces, Changing Spaces

Conference and to ensure your place at it!

….please feel free to send any inputs or inquiries to the Conference Coordinator at angusparkinson@gmail.com.

Looking forward to your support, input and participation!

CFCS³ Conference Team

give thanx for yesterday, today en kesho in the Q_t werd: we reveal s/heroes behind the masks,

(share our communing usiku at one a dem tambors for esu [odara]

en invite mo artists to)  co-create enchanted retreats

betwixt en between blue skies/ancient forests,

canoes on the Indian ocean en altars on mountains of the moon,

dis hadithi is the keeper of secrets, esu carry my prayer, divine messenger of transformashun, melding with [great] mystery ase::

dreams of, documenting en facilitating luv-in Elimu sanifu missions of [healing] Safe Spaces with people you [/we are blessed to] know like Lost Lyrics en Manifesto with The Weapon of The Revolution

#todavidwithlove projects watering seeds from Kampala to Nairobi, Tdot to Brooklyn, Cape-town to Dar-es-salaam en Kigali, Montego Bay to Santiago de Cuba, Lagos to Jinja en Tripoli,

from the diaspora of righteousness [back] to Afreekan shores, on a quest of maps with doors to no return.

Are you ready?

Hadithi? Hadithi? Hadithi njoo…….

Giza ya? Sahani ya?

Wetin dey (UKWELI YA) riddle of the sphinx o?

[between the lines: a queer afrikan reading of mukoma wa ngugi’s poetry]

Listen. Do you hear ghosts? Connect them to the sound of a canoe
on Indian Ocean. Listen to that tape of familiar beats that has weathered
foreign seasons. Sukus found in Salsa. Fela Kuti meets Masekela
in Appalachia. Do not inhale the coal fumes. Hold a memory.

The AntiHomosexuality Bill & Kato's Trial

[recent like the synergy of #todavidwithlove project or the rebirth of  pan-afrikan performing arts (papa) institute, en ancient like creashun o!]

Commit sins of transportation. Bite the past. Spit broken teeth
and colored blood that will chart global awareness. Learn
to say fuck without flinching. Seduce anarchy of the mind and try
to order schizophrenia in realms just outside the touch of your black

[nyeusi!]

hand. Image coming at you. Color it in Old English and an accented
haiku and see what you win. If lucky enough, if you are one of those
lucky cigar smoking sons of bitches, play the lottery and you might win
the lady’s hand. Do not try to break the chains that bind her feet.

realism

Hold her. Touch an image of her that is a mirage of you. Laugh
and say she is crazy to forget with you. Sip your beer gently. Light up,
let the sizzling seeds pass from your lips to hers. Watch the smoke
and its promise, it will turn you on onto possibilities of the night. Smile.

Ghosts. As a child voices sang in my sleep and then took to life. I dueled
them with screams that were hushed with threats of tranquility. I stole
Don Quixote’s sword and found a horse in my bouncing bed and would
have won the battle had it not been for the doctor who found Malaria

[read: HIV/AIDS, no fly zones, sodomy laws, polio, sleeping sickness, tuberculosis et cetera]

where there was none. Pills. Silent duels. And so when the police with guns
and big black coats came for my father, it must have been a dream I dreamt.
That night – pills with no water but morning tea still found a newspaper
damp with dew. Swords thrust, truths as righteousness of strength

bouncing horses and Marx -it all could have been a dream. Learn to stay up
late and talk of classes and footsteps. Not of classes but of labor at the nearest
Micky D’s. Dance to old rhythms and constitute common law while talking
of tradition. Find the nearest altar. Take pills without gun powder. Say

Mandela always with a smile. Miss her but call her a bitch. It will make

gemini by akwa

you feel like a man to stare her down feminism. Dust sprinkled so sparsely

and gently on your feet, stripped dress, gapped smile, black hair in rainbow

[ase]

your laugh and the way your fingers curled inwards – they always smelled
of plums. I miss our evenings by the pond, that time the sun refused to set
and we had to roll it over and down the hill You never did come to say good bye
how is it I remember your smile at the airport? Stay away from New York.

[even Brooklyn o??!]

[play…. spot the asylum seekers @ http://www.autostraddle.com/ ]

eke, the naija drag king

Too many mirrors of yourself. Read Harlem only in your sleep. Learn

to say Puerto Rican radicals got what was coming to them and Mexico

is no man’s land. Watch birds on national geographic migrate.
Amuse yourself in the sound of wing against wind. Ignore the wail

of the middle passage. Find beauty in trees where no necks were broken
and burning flesh was not sacrificed and color it Rainbow. You see,
its all creation. Streams, your feet washing clean. Your curved elbows
sending rays back to the sun. Your militant Khaki skirt wet at the folds.

I sent you a letter. In it I enclosed photos of you as I will remember
you tomorrow. Sometimes I am waiting for you at our pond scribbling
little notes shaped like butterflies and birds that bear your name.
It’s Sunday. How did you leave church to come to me? I swear you make

me laugh. A hungry bird once in mid Indian Ocean flight, very much
weakened by hunger and scared of what lay below, measured
wing against thigh and eat its feet. And as all must come down, it landed
on its head and died. My dear, eat your memories very carefully.

*This poem originally appeared in Hurling Words at Consciousness (AWP, 2006)

[give thanks for today, yesterday and tomorrow, give thanks for the continued guidance and protection of our ancestors]

Mukoma Wa Ngugi is the author of Nairobi Heat (Penguin, SA 2009), an anthology of poetry titled Hurling Words at Consciousness (AWP, 2006) and is a political columnist for the BBC’s Focus on Africa Magazine.  He was short listed for the Caine Prize for African writing in 2009.  He has also been shortlisted for the 2010 Penguin Prize for African Writing for his novel manuscript, The First and Second Books of Transition.

A former co-editor of Pambazuka News, his columns have appeared in the Guardian, International Herald Tribune, Chimurenga, Los Angeles Times, South African Labour Bulletin, and Business Daily Africa, and he has been a guest on Democracy Now, Al

Jazeera and the BBC World Service. His essays have appeared in the World Literature Review, the Black Commentator, Progressive Magazine and Radical History Review.  His short stories have been published in Wasafiri, Kenyon Review and St. Petersburg Review and poems in the New York Quarterly, Brick Magazine, Kwani?, Chimurenga and Tin House Magazine amongst other places.

Mukoma was born in 1971 in Evanston, Illinois and grew up in Kenya before returning to the United States for his undergraduate and graduate education. He is currently based in Cleveland, Ohio.  He is the son of World renowned African writer, Ngugi wa Thiong’o.  You can find his blog here.

He can also be found at: http://www.mukomawangugi.com/

[redo(ne): in another place not here, Make una read this list o! beaurriful people! E don reach time wey we fit dey use abbreviation for our own exceptional street lingua. Kpele o! We dey plot  big time to chop money… you dey excite now, abi? Yes, ooo.

special thanx to Bredrin en dadas in solidarity like @ http://papainstitute.org/, http://www.kubatanablogs.net/kubatana/, and http://blacklooks.org/, for introducing me to http://www.spectraspeaks.com/ to http://www.thefeeloffree.com/….   En on en on to all dey aiding me in creative process….kesho: seven habits of successful fairies]

[rapture.ase.]