De main ting I see at dis point is community – building communities where you can trust one another, where you can help a mama who is

crying because she has a pikin who is crying en she doesn’t know wot to give her.

You know, in de village, when you get up in de morning, de first ting you do is to go outside. But here, one day I was sitting all day inside without going out, en it occurred to me that this was de first time in my life I’d ever done that, except I wasn’t feeling well.

To get up in de morning en not go out among people is absolutely inconceivable to somebody in de kijiji. Because when you stay all day inside, it means that something isn’t going right with you, en people worry bout you. And so we begin by going outside, talking to our neighbours en helping each other out.

It’s small steps like dis. It’s like wot we say: If you have a baby, you don’t throw her away because she’s small. You keep her en keep nurturing her, knowing dat one day she’s going to be a grown-up. So these are de kinds of smart tings we can do, nurturing many small relationships so dat one day community can happen….

It is as difficult for indigenous people to conceive of life without a community as it is for most Westerners to imagine life in a community.

To create a community dat will work for people here, there is a need to look carefully at some of de fundamentals of a healthy community – spirit, children, elders, responsibility, gift-giving, accountability, ancestors, and ritual. These elements form de base of a community. And it doesn’t have to start with alot of people. I’d rather have a circle of good friends en be a community with them than just get lost in a crowd of people who don’t care at all.

Intimacy, de natural attraction of two human beings to each other, is something that de

elders say is actually prompted by spirit, en spirit brings people together in order to give them de opportunity to grow together. That growth is directly connected to de gifts that two people are capable of providing to de kijiji. And this is why when a couple is in trouble, the whole kijiji is in trouble….

When we start to feel a problem, we tend to think it’s jus two people who are involved en we forget about the fact that spirit is there. We tend to forget that we have allies who can bring us strength. We forget to ask for help from rafikis or family members.

In de village, it’s easier for people because every morning when you wake up somebody will come and ask you, “Did you hear something sweet last night?” and if you remain silent or you say no, then de person will get worried because something is wrong. If you didn’t hear something good, it means that something sour must have taken de place of good. They will then get to de bottom of that problem before it gets out of control….

In other [indigenUS] werds,

…Plains Native men en women are aware of an oral legacy of holy men en women unknown to outsiders.

Memories of ancestors en their spiritual accomplishments are combined with personal experience to shape a view of de spiritual present. Holy womben who were ancestors continuously come to light….For de tribal peoples of dis land, dis balancing between two worlds can be very precarious, both spiritually en physically.

Popular Western culture loves to borrow things from de indigenous peoples of Turtle Island. Although it is possible that such “ceremonies” as “Native” drumming and sweat baths help people to get back in touch with de natural world, they are imperfectly lifted from a continuum of religious ceremonies that carry indigenous peoples from birth, through life’s struggles, to death en beyond.

What many of today’s medicine men, womben en two-spirit people do most is help people who are “injured” by living as a colonized tribal people. In effect, they doctor depression, lack of positive identity, suicidal behaviour, drug abuse, alcoholism, family crises, spouse abuse, en stress-related illnesses that are effects of colonization. They also doctor “standard” types of illnesses such as cancer as well, but most “obvious” problems are left to run their course or are treated by a white physician.

To overstand, at any level, de meaning of these ceremonies en their relationship to de religions from which they are borrowed requires a fairly deep understanding of their true cultural context, which includes knowing those mythic hadithi of creashun, ancient

god/desses, en tricksters that are used to shape en de young in indigenous worlds…..

A seeker of spiritual understanding would not be able to understand Judaism, en de beliefs en ceremonies that go with it, without reading de Old Testament. We must understand de origin of de metaphors acted out in de ritual, to understand de place en use of that ritual within that particular belief system. For indigenous peoples (around dis dunia), de beginning is told in their own unique “tribal” creashun hadithi, kama…

Ihan’bla: To Dream

Plains Native/Indian pikin raised close to tradishun learn to listen to en interpret de dream world, which is de lasting en sacred dunia. De ability to acquire de clear memory of ndotos, to discriminate between significant en insignificant dreams, to remember them in detail., en to interpret them satisfactorily must be acquired in

childhood. The amount of time it takes to interpret or understand a dream might be moments, or it might be a lifetime.

Most of de traditional crafts of Plains Indian womben are tedious en repetitive, leaving a great amount of time for reflection en contemplation. Both men en womben use dreams to re/learn bout de sacred world. For some it is a lifetime of exploration en learning de ukwelis of de universe.

Some womben in their special capacity as “dreamers” are called upon, by de clarity en regularity of their dreams, to warn people of impending problems en to predict en possibly alter de outcome of events by overstanding what their dreams are about…..

Womben who become “doctors” are in essence no different from any other womban in de community except that they have an additional role to fulfill. It is important to realize that they are not considered strange or necessarily exceptional. Though de powah of their ceremonies may command deep respect, in most instances their role in de family en community life are de same as those of other womben…..

In Lakota society, de spiritual en economic powahs of womben were not only acknowledged but well respected. When a man took a wife, he lived in her camp. When de Lakota traced their ancestry, while acknowledging en respecting their father’s relatives, most took de band name of their mothers. These patterns still exist.

Because Lakota society is more balanced with regard to male, female and two-spirit forces than other societies, it is little wonder that there are two commonly told legends about de end of de world – one female-based, de other male. Here is a female version told to Tilda Long Soldier by de late Lucy Swan, a respected Lakota elder, in de mid-1970s.

There is a very old womban who sits on de edge of a tall bluff. She is quilling a beautiful design on a buffalo robe. The womban is very old, so she tires easily. Besides her sits an ancient dog. He is so old that he has very few teeth. Even though he is old, he is still playful.

Every day the womban quills that buffalo robe. Soon she is tired en falls asleep. When she rests at night, de dog unravels all that she did de day before. If that dog forgets to unravel those quills, or gets too old, de old womban will finish de robe. That will be de end of de world.

This is a male version that Tilda heard from her grandmama, de late Dora (Little Warrior) Rooks, in de 1970s.

At one time there was a young [buffalo] bull. He had four strong legs. As de first three ages passed, he lost three of his legs, one by one. Every year he loses one hair.

Grandma Dora told me, “The white people are descended from de spider people. They have learned to use electricity. That electricity once belonged only to de Wakinyan [Thunder Beings].

To do this they up wires on poles. They send these wires all over. As electricity covers de earth, it creates a huge spider web. One day this spider web will cause a great fiya. This will cause de buffalo to lose its last leg en fall to de earth. This will be end of de world.

There are versions that do not refer to electricity, but always de buffalo is brought down by man’s mistake. Grandma Dora’s version gives clear insight into beliefs held by some Lakota……Fafanua.

[remixed en reposted with overflowing upendo] from The Spirit of Intimacy – Ancient African Teachings in The Ways of Relationships  & Walking in The Sacred Manner 

Healers, Dreamers and Pipe Carriers – Medicine Women of the Plains Indians by Mark St.Pierre and Tilda Long Soldier.

hadithi? hadithi? hadithi njoo, ukweli njoo, utamu kolea….giza ya?

(Reposted with big love en respekt from) Chuka Nnabuife on why 2011 is the Year of Interesting Books Coming

NEXT year will be eventful in the African books section. Already publishers are introducing books they will release in the first half of the year. Amazon will put out a new anthology containing the works of Chinua Achebe, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, John Coetzee, Nardine Gordimer, Ben Okri and other Caine Prize winning writers. Ngugi wa Thiongo will also come out with a new book due for release in February 2011 on the Amazon list.

In Pambazuka Press, an about to be released book, No Land! No House! No Vote! Voices from Symphony Way, captures the tale of resilence while throwing the reader back to memory of the segregative Apartheid rule in South Africa.

The anthology of factual tales captured in both poetic and prose (media feature report format) narrates the several accounts of Cape Town, South Africa’s Symphony Way pavement dwellers who, like in film story, found themselves catapulted from their hitherto poor settlement to an better developed estate upon the end of the Apartheid only to be pushed out of the houses almost as suddenly as their fortune changed.

The publishers promote the work thus: “This anthology is written by shack-dwelling families in Cape Town who were moved into houses but soon afterwards evicted again. They organised the Symphony Way Anti-Eviction and here write about their experiences.

 “Many outside South Africa imagine that after Mandela was freed and the ANC won free elections all was well. But the last two decades have led to increased poverty and inequality. Although a few black South Africans have become wealthy, for many the struggle against apartheid never ended because the ethos of apartheid continues to live.”

The book follows several hundreds of shanty-dwelling families in Cape Town who, early in 2007, were moved into houses they had been waiting for since the end of Apartheid. But soon they were told that the move had been illegal and they were kicked out of their new homes. In protest, they built shacks next to the road opposite the housing project. And, soon a vibrant settlement of hundreds of ramshackled huts inhabited by organised protesting settlers blossomed there. It became known as Symphony Way. Home ground of Symphony Way Anti-Eviction Campaign, whose membership vowed to stay on the road until the government gave them permanent housing. Eventually, the tales from the protesting slum-dwellers turns out a warm, close-knit and eventful one – full of vibrant communal lives, simmering relationships, love, hate and blood ties. The book also rubs off some disturbing feeling that the robust but poor settlement was forcefully moved to make the country host last summer’s football’s World Cup without what the authorities deem an odd sight for tourists.

Promoters’ of the book who inform that its audience target include anthropologists, activists, campaigners, NGO-workers, academics, journalists, commentators state: “This anthology is both testimony and poetry. There are stories of justice miscarried, of violence domestic and public, of bigotry and xenophobia. But amid the horror there is beauty: relationships between aunties, husbands, wives and children; daughters named Hope and Symphony. This book is a means to dignity, a way for the poor to reflect and be reflected. It is testimony that there’s thinking in the shacks, that there are humans who dialogue, theorise and fight to bring about change.

Two Symphony Way evictees were featured in a Guardian article of 1 April 2010: Badronessa Morris: ‘The police treat us like animals. They swear at us, pepper spray us, search us in public, even children. At 10 o’clock you must be inside: the police come and tell you to go into your place and turn down the music. In my old home we used to sit outside all night with the fire.’

Jane Roberts: ‘It’s a dumping place. They took people from the streets because they don’t want them in the city for the World Cup. Now we are living in a concentration camp.’

No Land! No House! No Vote! Voices from Symphony Way set for release in March 2011 is available for ebook order in United Kingdom.

Another up coming book of interest from the same publishers is African Sexualities: A Reader, by Sylvia Tamale. In the work Ms Tamale probes, the perculiar traits of African sexualities with the aim “to inspire a new generation of students and teachers to study, reflect and gain fresh and critical insights into the complex issues of gender and sexuality.”

Promoters say the book seeks to open new frontiers of thinking about African notiopns of sex. African Sexualities stretches the space to several spheres of multidisciplinary scholarship.

The book with authors who are scholars, researchers, professionals, practitioners and experts from different regions of Africa and Africa’s Diaspora comes in themed sections, all introduced by a framing essay.”

The authors use essays, case studies, poetry, news clips, songs, fiction, memoirs, letters, interviews, short film scripts and photographs from a wide political spectrum to examine dominant and deviant sexualities, analyse the body as a site of political, cultural and social contestation and investigate the intersections between sex, power, masculinities and femininities. The book adopts a feminist approach that analyses sexuality within patriarchal structures of oppression while also highlighting its emancipatory potential.

“As well as using popular culture to help address the ‘what, why, how, when and where’ questions, the contributors also provide a critical mapping of African sexualities that informs readers about the plurality and complexities of African sexualities – desires, practices, fantasies, identities, taboos, abuses, violations, stigmas, transgressions and sanctions. At the same time, they pose gender-sensitive and politically aware questions that challenge the reader to interrogate assumptions and hegemonic sexuality discourses, thereby unmapping the intricate and complex terrain of African sexualities.

“The blend of approaches and styles enhances the book’s accessibility and usefulness for teaching as well as allowing for historical and textual contextualisation.”

It is written for audiences in the higher education and postgradute levels. Due date of emerging from press is June 2011.

Among other books coming from Pambazuka and Fahamu books are African Women Writing Resistance, An Anthology of Contemporary Voices an anthology of African-born contributors who “move beyond the linked dichotomies of victim/oppressor and victim/heroine to present their experiences of resistance in full complexity: they are at the forward edge of the tide of women’s empowerment moving across Afrika.”

My Dream is to be Bold, a feminist oriented work is among them as well as Dust from our Eyes an Unblinkered Look at Africa, a Joan Baxter tale of the diversity of Africa and the resilience and spirit of its people.

From Citizen to Refugee, Uganda Asians come to Britain by Mahmood Mamdani is another nostalgia awakening book to be expected. It dwells on the seriously embattled life of Asians in Uganda during the eventful dictatorial reign of the late Gen. Idi Amin in the 1970s. It is a re-publication of 1972’s original. The author, Mamdani, an eye witness, describes the feelings experienced by Uganda’s Asians and tells of their camps’ political culture.

[http://www.compassnewspaper.com/NG/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=71700%3A2011-year-of-interesting-books-coming&catid=54%3Aarts&Itemid=694]

http://www.montrealgazette.com/life/Montreal+protesters+rally+support+WikiLeaks/3999493/story.html

Dear friends, 

The chilling intimidation campaign against WikiLeaks (when they have broken no laws) is an attack on freedom of the press and democracy. We urgently need a massive public outcry to stop the crackdown — let’s get to 1 million voices and take out full page ads in US newspapers this week!

The massive campaign of intimidation against WikiLeaks is sending a chill through free press advocates everywhere.

Legal experts say WikiLeaks has likely broken no laws. Yet top US politicians have called it a terrorist group and commentators have urged assassination of its staff. The organization has come under massive government and corporate attack, but WikiLeaks is only publishing information provided by a whistleblower. And it has partnered with the world’s leading newspapers (NYT, Guardian, Spiegel etc) to carefully vet the information it publishes.

The massive extra-judicial intimidation of WikiLeaks is an attack on democracy. We urgently need a public outcry for freedom of the press and expression. Sign the petition to stop the crackdown and forward this email to everyone — let’s get to 1 million voices and take out full page ads in US newspapers this week!

http://www.avaaz.org/en/wikileaks_petition/?vl

WikiLeaks isn’t acting alone — it’s partnered with the top newspapers in the world (New York Times, The Guardian, Der Spiegel, etc) to carefully review 250,000 US diplomatic cables and remove any information that it is irresponsible to publish. Only 800 cables have been published so far. Past WikiLeaks publications have exposed government-backed torture, the murder of innocent civilians in Iraq and Afghanistan, and corporate corruption.

The US government is currently pursuing all legal avenues to stop WikiLeaks from publishing more cables, but the laws of democracies protect freedom of the press. The US and other governments may not like the laws that protect our freedom of expression, but that’s exactly why it’s so important that we have them, and why only a democratic process can change them.

Reasonable people can disagree on whether WikiLeaks and the leading newspapers it’s partnered with are releasing more information than the public should see. Whether the releases undermine diplomatic confidentiality and whether that’s a good thing. Whether WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has the personal character of a hero or a villain. But none of this justifies a vicious campaign of intimidation to silence a legal media outlet by governments and corporations. Click below to join the call to stop the crackdown:

http://www.avaaz.org/en/wikileaks_petition/?vl

Ever wonder why the media so rarely gives the full story of what happens behind the scenes? This is why – because when they do, governments can be vicious in their response. And when that happens, it’s up to the public to stand up for our democratic rights to a free press and freedom of expression. Never has there been a more vital time for us to do so.

With hope,

Ricken, Emma, Alex, Alice, Maria Paz and the rest of the Avaaz team.

SOURCES:

Law experts say WikiLeaks in the clear (ABC)

http://www.abc.net.au/worldtoday/content/2010/s3086781.htm

 

WikiLeaks are a bunch of terrorists, says leading U.S. congressman (Mail Online)

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1333879/WikiLeaks-terrorists-says-leading-US-congressman-Peter-King.html

Cyber guerrillas can help US (Financial Times)

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/d3dd7c40-ff15-11df-956b-00144feab49a.html#axzz17QvQ4Ht5

Amazon drops WikiLeaks under political pressure (Yahoo)

http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20101201/tc_afp/usdiplomacyinternetwikileakscongressamazon

“WikiLeaks avenged by hacktivists” (PC World):

http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/212701/operation_payback_wikileaks_avenged_by_hacktivists.html

US Gov shows true control over Internet with WikiLeaks containment (Tippett.org)

http://www.tippett.org/2010/12/us-gov-shows-true-control-over-internet-with-wikileaks-containment/

US embassy cables culprit should be executed, says Mike Huckabee (The Guardian)

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/dec/01/us-embassy-cables-executed-mike-huckabee

WikiLeaks ditched by MasterCard, Visa. Who’s next? (The Christian Science Monitor)

http://www.csmonitor.com/Innovation/Horizons/2010/1207/WikiLeaks-ditched-by-MasterCard-Visa.-Who-s-next

Assange’s Interpol Warrant Is for Having Sex Without a Condom (The Slatest)
http://slatest.slate.com/id/2276690/

Support the Avaaz community! We’re entirely funded by donations and receive no money from governments or corporations. Our dedicated team ensures even the smallest contributions go a long way……..

Avaaz.org is a 6.4-million-person global campaign network that works to ensure that the views and values of the world’s people shape global decision-making. (“Avaaz” means “voice” or “song” in many languages.) Avaaz members live in every nation of the world; our team is spread across 13 countries on 4 continents and operates in 14 languages. Learn about some of Avaaz’s biggest campaigns here, or follow us on Facebook or Twitter.

 We have to admit that life, in a global view of tings, in the past few weeks en moons has been getting mysterious en mysteriouser, as more (open) secrets continue to be dramatically re-discovered, en the urgency of changing constitutions en shifting paradigms rises

 [read as: the elephant in the ‘political’ world is the symbolism of wikileaks latest ‘data’ dump and the ‘witch-hunting’ of Julian Assange and the Pandora of an advisory board and network. Even though there’s nothing new that those cables revealed so far…., that we haven’t already witnessed and understood from the U.S of A’s government’s assaults in ‘other’ indigenus lands already. The rest of the herd in dis story are the queer/trans Afrikans murdered in hate crimes, those that we can and can not YET  talk about]

as we re/claim the powah of silence, in the spaces between truth and propaganda….

I give thanks for our ancestors, for all the dismantling of the masters houses that has laid the foundation for us to continue rebuilding  learning communities…..I give thanks for warriors and god/desse/s of love that spread hope en abundance

and I pray that the lessons of the tragedies of those whose lives were taken brutally, those that we can name en the ones whose names we do not mention yet,  in public,  don’t have to repeat themselves….

because some of our truth remains as an open secret still, en those of us who know of heinous crimes, are tied by the consideration of the ethics of the ‘closet’ and the safety we need to maintain for our bredrin en dadas

the trouble with secrets is that they’re oxymorons,  in the spaces between oppression and radical transformation, one of the many questions lies in how we can use them most powerfully to co-create positive safe spaces that can mediate their passage into open dialogue

I give thanks for the mysteries of life/death/life cycles, and the continued resistance and renewal of knowledge coming (back) into riddin with these cycles…

http://www.blacklooks.org/2010/12/lesbian-activist-ncumisa-mzamelo-found-murdered/

This open letter, to my beloved peeps, is a eulogy for bredrin en dadas that are victims of hate (a litany of our collective resistance and survival).

Dis letter is another  call-out to networks of comrades, friends and relatives across many spaces to deepen and harvest our connecshuns with/in grassroots networks, amongst the intersections of social movements, wherever we find ourselves with rafikis, to co-create communities of liberatory pratice, and continue to hold to (ac)count all perpertrators of injustice…

http://notuhuru.com/?p=68

like, jus from the drama jus in the past few weeks,  top nominations of people to be charged with appropriately classified crimes,  include tom flanagan, raila odinga and the UN General Assembly Human Rights Committee

[http://www.nation.co.ke/oped/Opinion/Raila%20owes%20Kenyans%20an%20apology/-/440808/1066846/-/mnntwv/-/index.html]

julian assange’s life is in danger, and already we know of (+)1 ‘closeted’ person(s) brutally killed in Kenya in the last week, after the Prime Minister so shamelessly exploited hateful western constructions of homophobia that were institutionalised to suppress indigenus traditions, forbidden (but not forgotten) in neo-colonial regimes, funded by christian fundamentalists and defended by kin still….

the bigger point though isthe  not the culprits, because our thriving depends on the ones who facilitate positive transformation, ofcourse….

what continues to inspire en ground me, and many others, are the growing numbers of warriors joining circles and networks of liberatory causes and spreading healing en love in abundance….

so, dear beloved peeps, given all that we DO  have, how do we (continue to) co-create mo containers to harvest the powah of all those intersections of our diversity,across diverse spaces?

how do we transform the trauma of the latest events to galvanise our working on our own UNITY first, not only the continent but most significantly, with di diaspora?

Ẹni tí eégún ńlé kó máa rọ́jú; bó ti ńrẹ ará ayé, bẹ́ẹ̀ ní ńrẹ ará ọ̀run.

The person being chased by a masquerader should persevere; just as an earthling tires, so does the being from heaven.

(Perseverance solves all problems.)

Yoruba Proverb

ase, ase…..

Dear  be/loved peeps…..

 How do we harvest the resources we have to share with our communities, across time and spaces? How do we harness the powah! of the all those intersections of our diversity to mobilise continental Afrikans and those in the diaspora in re-constitutional-i- sing our political and social systems to sustain not only all Afrikan people’s liberation, but all our living relatives?

[like real tox we all know many gifted en loving folks in our communities that are hungry to gain more balance, grounding en wellbeing while serving the frontlines in their hoods, many of us have be/come familiar with weariness en ‘thick’ skins, with living ‘cheque’ to ‘check’, en sacrificing ‘personal’ time for collective sowing, planting en harvesting bounties that shrink en swell according to imperialist currencies and the commitment of warriors….truthIS  there’s always a crisis in the horizon..day before yesterday it was the prime minister spewing hatred in a call to arrest gays and lesbians, and those hours of panic en fear, a few weeks ago it was the (slow) burning of witches, every day it’s the po’ and indigenus people’s struggle]

[http://www.capitalfm.co.ke/news/Kenyanews/Arrest-gays,-Kenyan-PM-orders-10670.html]

Real tox: who en where are the ones who are willing to harvest the powah! of our love for Afrika(ns) to rebuild sustaining and sustainable united villages, cities en states of Afreeka that hold us ALL safely? are the questions too massive to reason en organise through, outside of OUR  social movements? or are they too specific? what is the appropriate scale to work through on a small-ish blog on the world wide web? what are the right questions to galvanise each other to seek ourselves out and support our family en comrades mo?

in the (t)here en then en now, in solidarity with LGBTTIQ folks in Kenya, what creative sustained resistance and renewal can we magically craft and organise in response to the increasing backlash to Queer/trans communities in East Afrika?

Like that public call of hate for mo’ state-sanctioned homophobia, and quite explicitly for mass allegiance to our persecution…. that kinda shit gets people killed, and Dear Raila, he knows that very well, so today, en tomorrow en the moons en years after, it would be amazing and much needed to hear more voices calling for mo’ than a public retraction, en organise with more bodies to advocate for and serve queer/trans communties all over Afrika

coz this shit is Raila’s hateful call and Bahati’s Bill , Burundi and Rwanda, Nigeria and South Afrika, Ayiti and Jamaica,  it’s about 53 African nations (that technically really should be states) denying observer status to the Coalition of African Lesbians and upholding coloniser’s/foreign laws so shamelessly….

the bigger point is, dis solidarity ofcourse is much more than media campaigns or pointing fingers, it’s bout working collectively on sustaining ourselves en our growing movements, en harvesting all the wealth we do have…..hadithi kama

African women’s decade: strategic opportunities http://www.pambazuka.org/en/category/features/69053

Ayiti: reclaiming sovereignty http://www.pambazuka.org/en/category/features/69025

Western Sahara: the forgotten conflict

The Western Sahara conflict with Morocco is one of those almost forgotten conflicts. It is one that is an unbelievable 35 years old – and still the Moroccan government remains intransigent. A Moroccan About a World around him reports on recent uprising in one of the camps in Laayoune the main city in occupied Western Sahara. Prior to this King Mohammed VI had accused Algeria of human rights violations against Saharawis in Tindouf camps ignoring his country’s central part in why they are there in the first place.

‘The violence was triggered when a battalion-size security force descended on the camp in the early hours of Monday in an attempt to raze it and disperse its residents using tear gas and water cannons. The protests seeped into Laayoune and resulted in substantial material damage and loss of life as a group of the camp’s residents that an official Ministry of Interior statement described as wanted criminals and subversive agents clashed with the security forces. Black smoke bellowed over the city and debris littered its arteries. The number of people injured and killed could not yet be confirmed. According to the BBC, about seventy people have been injured and over ten have died.’…..read more @ http://www.pambazuka.org/en/category/features/69060

na pia…..

What powah! does reclaiming indigenus knowledge en spirituality have for harvesting all those intersections of our diversity?

….not against flesh en blood

 Sister Outsider

check dis….

Mr Odinga on Sunday said that police should arrest anyone found engaging in such behaviours and take appropriate legal action against them.

“We will not tolerate such behaviours in the country. The constitution is very clear on this issue and men or women found engaging in homosexuality will not be spared,” Mr Odinga said.

Listen to Raila

“Any man found engaging in sexual activities with another man should be arrested. Even women found engaging in sexual activities will be arrested,” the premier warned.

Speaking at a public rally at the Kamukunji grounds in his Nairobi’s Kibera constituency on Sunday afternoon, the Prime Minister cited the recent population census results which put the ratio of men to women equal and wondered why people should engage in homosexuality.

“This [homosexual] kind of behaviours will not be tolerated in this country. Men or women found engaging in those acts deserve to be arrested and will be arrested,” he told the crowd.

He said leaders who were propagating rumours of same sex marriages in Kenya during campaigns for the new Constitution had failed miserably because Kenyans did not buy their propaganda.

“Those were lies from leaders who wanted to confuse Kenyans to reject the new law; the Constitution is very clear on that matter. It does not state anywhere that same sex marriage is legal in Kenya,” he added.

The Bill of Rights under chapter four of the new Constitution states that: “Every adult has the right to marry a person of the opposite sex, based on the free consent of the parties.”

A move by Uganda to introduce a Bill calling for long jail terms or death penalty in some cases of homosexuality received international condemnation, with US President Barack Obama describing it as “odious”.

He said: “But surely we can agree that it is unconscionable to target gays and lesbians for who they are, whether it is here in the United States or… more extremely, in odious laws that are being proposed more recently in Uganda.”
But notwithstanding Obama’s remarks, homosexual acts are now illegal in Uganda and attracts jail terms of up to 14 years in prison.

Read more: http://www.capitalfm.co.ke/news/Kenyanews/Arrest-gays,-Kenyan-PM-orders-10670.html#ixzz16pge8BvV

[and that is the story of how Raila tried to score cheap points, and took another brutal blow to his leadership, going to show yet again, what he sealed in ink when he accepted his position as prime minister, that he is not the rightful leader of our beloved country Kenya, maybe the other Agwambo, but dis one here o…..he dun make too much war o, it’s time for him to go O, no? in the spirit of….]

Ubuntu

many possibilities……

“They say we have been here for 60,000 years, but it is much longer. We have been here since the time before time begin. We have come directly out of the Dreamtime of the Creative Ancestors. We have lived and kept the earth as it was on the First Day.”
(Anonymous Aboriginal Tribal Elder)

June 21 was chosen because of the cultural significance of the summer solstice, the first day of summer and longest day of the year. Many aboriginal groups mark the date as a time to celebrate their heritage.

“On June 21st, this year and every year, Canada will honour the native peoples who first brought humanity to this great land,” said Leblanc. “And may the first peoples of our past always be full and proud partners in our future.”

[extracted from http://www.cbc.ca/news/background/aboriginals/aboriginalday.html ]

 

The day’s proclamation was an event 14 years in the making.

 

I have been to the end of the earth.


I have been to the end of the waters.
I have been to the end of the sky.
I have been to the end of the mountains.
I have found none that are not my friends.
 

Navajo proverb

 

 

A brief history of National Aboriginal Day:

1982: National Indian Brotherhood (now the Assembly of First Nations) calls for the creation of National Aboriginal Solidarity Day on June 21.

 

1990: Quebec legislature recognizes June 21 as a day to celebrate aboriginal culture.

1995: The Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples recommends the designation of a National First Peoples Day. The Sacred Assembly, a national conference of aboriginal and non-aboriginal people chaired by Elijah Harper, calls for a national holiday to celebrate the contributions of Canada’s Aboriginal Peoples.



1996: June 13: Gov. Gen. Roméo LeBlanc declares June 21 as National Aboriginal Day after consultations with various aboriginal groups. The inaugural day is celebrated with events from coast to coast to coast.

Since then, the day has been celebrated in both small venues – such as elementary schools – and large venues alike.

http://6nsolidarity.wordpress.com/

In 2005, two of Canada’s big banks hosted events at their downtown Toronto offices to mark the day. Also that year, in Iqaluit, the day was marked in a special way – 11 Inuit men and women made up the graduating class of the Akitsiraq law school, a one-time co-operative venture between the University of Victoria and Nunavut Arctic College meant to boost the number of lawyers in the North. Overnight, Nunavut’s population of Inuit lawyers grew from one – Premier Paul Okalik – to 12.

To mark the 10th anniversary of National Aboriginal Day, dozens of formal and informal events were planned across the country, ranging from sunrise ceremonies at Nathan Phillips Square in Toronto to aboriginal art workshops at the Canadian Museum of Civilization in Gatineau, Que. There’s also a conference on Aboriginal contributions to the Canadian military experience at Royal Military College in Kingston.

The day kicks off the beginning of the annual 11-day Celebrate Canada! festivities held from June 21 to July 1. The festivities also include St-Jean Baptiste Day (June 24), Canadian Multiculturalism Day (June 27) and Canada Day (July 1).

 

FAQs on aboriginal Canadians:

http://friendsofsixnations.bravehost.com/

How many aboriginal Canadians are there in Canada?
In 2001, 3.4 per cent of Canadians were aboriginal, a total of 976,305 people. Of those, 62 per cent were North American Indian, about 30 per cent were Métis, and 5 per cent were Inuit.

 

How many live on and off reserves?
About seven out of 10 aboriginal people live off a reserve, according to the 2001 census, with almost a third of those living in large cities. Nearly 30 per cent live on reserves.

Where do aboriginal people live in Canada?
In 2001, the provinces with the largest aboriginal populations were Ontario, British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan.

Winnipeg had the largest North American Indian population among census metropolitan areas, with 22,955. Alberta had the highest proportion of Métis, at 23 per cent. And half of Canada’s Inuit population lives in Nunavut.

http://sisis.nativeweb.org/index.html
What are the projections for Canada’s aboriginal population?
By 2017, there will be an estimated 1.39 million to 1.43 million aboriginal persons, according to Statistics Canada. Aboriginals would represent 4.1 per cent of the Canadian population, up from 3.4 per cent in 2001.

Canada’s aboriginal population is expected to grow by 1.8 per cent annually, more than twice the rate of 0.7 per cent for the general population. The aboriginal birth rate is 1.5 times the Canadian birth rate.

“Oh, Eagle, come with wings outspread in sunny skies.
Oh, Eagle, come and bring us peace, thy gentle peace.
Oh, Eagle, come and give new life to us who pray.”

Pawnee Prayer

ase, ase

ase, ase o.

June 24: Day of Action for Indigenous Rights!
11:00AM, March start point: Queen’s Park, South Lawn
To arrange a bus ride from Ottawa to Toronto for June 24, please send your request at

http://g20.torontomobilize.org/ottawatranspo

Come MARCH with community members at the Indigenous Day of Action Against the G8/G20 on June 24th in Toronto:

http://www.defendersoftheland.org/story/179