I’m always soaring in love all ova again when summer comes round. every year in tdot has been filled with kindred spirits en honourable ones that have had me calling turtle island my new home going on a decade now, en dis year has been di most magical one yet…na always there’s the pull back to my true-true nyumbas, the fresh-off-di-boat immigrant experience with a queer twist, like di spaces between belonging na self (!) imposed exile…..

I heart tdot for the balms of evolving Pride weeks, Afro & Jazz fests, en divine zawadis like free Queen of Soul concerts on a Friday nite in di heart of downtown. nashukuru di revolushun being documented with Back To Our Roots Press; en i heart tdot massives for y/our swagger…

Lovers & Friends Show

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You’ll never believe wot happened is always a great way to start……

There’s a story I know. It’s about de earth en how it floats in space on de back of a turtle. I’ve heard this story many times, and each someone tells the story, it changes. Sometimes the change is simply in the voice of de storyteller. Sometimes the change is in de details. Sometimes in de order of events. Other times it’s de dialogue or response of de audience. But in all the telling of the tellers, the world

 never leaves de turtle’s back. And de turtle never swims away.

[revised excerpts from] the truth about stories: a native narrative [according to] thomas king

[kama ni ukweli…..]

Consider these dreamscapes of using the arts for educational-paradigm shifts in harvesting Pan-Afrikan memories of legends like Audre Lorde, Makmende, Malcolm X, Mandela, Marcus Garvey na Mbuya Nehanda:

kwasababu [because]

when WE speak we are afraid
our words will not be heard            nor welcomed
but when we are silent         we are still afraid

So it is better to speak
remembering
we were never meant to survive

[in de spaces between: exploring how to not only reconcile but embrace queer/trans identities na (with) akina baba, mama na watoto WA– Afreeka]

    1. co-[re]create  (a tribute to those among us who carry the sage secrets of loving like) The Black Unicorn – in #Makmende Amerudi [with d’bi young.anitafrika en a map to the door of no return: notes on belonging – in dub ]

starring Ngozi Paul as  Britannia Zimeisha

[and Tsholo Khalema as Nneke Dumela in #theNekkydtruthis]….

(Not-so) long ago in a thriving learning village within a global matrix of farmers en soldiers of love, mo’ malaikas joined the pan-afrikan performing arts institute [in Cape Town] as artists-in-residence.

like [Check] dis’ sista we love, respekt en admire so…. ngozi paul is an actor, writer, director and executive producer, best known for her celebrated role of starr on the hit canadian show ‘da kink in my hair – a series which she co-created and executive produced. a true renaissance woman, ngozi is committed to telling universal stories through her tuned afrocentric perspective. her resolute commitment to telling ethnodiverse stories is apparent in the compelling body of work. ngozi has been named one of toronto’s ‘top ten actors’ by now magazine, and nominated for ‘best actress’ at u.k.’s black international film Festival for her powerful performance as susan in bayan. on the stage, ngozi is a proud recipient of stratford festival’s ‘tyrone guthrie award’. ngozi paul was an integral member of the original creative team of canada’s first black sitcom, lord have mercy!, which was nominated for two gemini awards including best comedic series. as the founder and president of ngozika productions, ngozi has created diverse content. ngozika productions is currently working on an innovative webbased series to be launched later this year and its debut feature film.

2.  Re-write (de hadithi of) Britannia zimeisha as “First mke (-si-mume)” [#nohomo] na Makmende as himself in (de mama of dis) ‘Amerudi’ series: where he is married to two of the Laydayz (na Godfrey) na Abscondita ni de fourth ‘mysterious’ wife aka. Fairy god sista [#notonthedownlow] in dis ‘big love(upendo)’ family

[herstory basi ni hadithi zetu….kama asili ya malaika, of gate-keepers na griots]

hadithi? hadithi? paukwa! pakawa! hadithi njoo…..

3.

Celebrate milestones in the growth of things like our love for each other, our families and back-to-Afreeka (is-the-future) movements.      [Hadithi kama…..Nakumbuka]

I remember when GALCK was officially launched in December 2008, still riding off the magic of moments-for-life like those, participating in en witnessing years of Under [en in the mainstream mis-reported/werd-on-the]- ground, rebuilding en teaching communities

Nakumbuka the touch of heaven shared with not only those that gathered to commemorate the birth of a queer/trans center of community work in the moyo wa[heart of] Nairobi but those that wished they were there and shared love en mo resources with US in the struggle for Afrikan liberation…for this en so much mo, I yam infinitely grateful.

4.     Take back de re-post.

It is clear that despite the fragmentation and marginalisation that modernity has imposed on the people of Africa, elements of Ubuntu still exist in African societies through languages, cultures and knowledge systems. Ubuntu seeks a restoration of balance in relations between individuals inter se and between individuals and nature. In the new situation in which the holistic individuals now find themselves united in solidarity – no longer alienated and isolated – they find Abantu in existence with elements of Ubuntu still with them. The holistic individuals find themselves already embedded in the culture of Ubuntu……

Such a new environment requires that in order to fit in the new combined human environment of interconnectedness and wholeness, such new combined individuals have to make their rules of a restorative society on an on-going basis.

Already academic researchers are beginning to examine this new situation by exploring the parallels between online social networking and the practices of ‘tribal’ societies that McLuhan envisaged. In the collective profile-surfing essential for ‘face-booking’ and ‘my-spacing’ in which they try to engage in ‘friending’, they begin to see the resurgence of ancient patterns of oral communication. ……

As Archbishop Desmond Tutu once declared about the philosophy of Ubuntu, which he called ‘this thing’:
‘Africans have this thing called Ubuntu…the essence of being human. It is part of the gift that Africans will give the world. It embraces hospitality, caring about others, willing to go the extra mile for the sake of others.
We believe a person is a person through another person, that my humanity is caught up, bound up and inextricable in yours. When I dehumanise you I inexorably dehumanise myself. The solitary individual is a contradiction in terms and, therefore, you seek to work for the common good because your humanity comes into its own community, in belonging.’…….
It is clear that the new society cannot reproduce a society that lived by the principles of Ubuntu for that was a qualitatively different society. But surely there are some lessons that can be learnt from that experience for the new society that those engaged in revolts seem to be demanding.
[ excerpts of The transformation of the global system and its IMPLICATIONS FOR AFRICA by Dani Wadada Nabudere http://www.pambazuka.org/en/category/features/72529 ]

#ukweli ni: there’s some times I feel mo’ like a lone wolf from a pack of [structurally] dysfunctional hybrids, seemingly isolated/marginalised…. yet always

because of ‘this ting called ubuntu’ that’s neva got me lonely in dis concrete jungle surrounded with the wealth of Bredrin en dadas, children en elders, healers, righteous teachers, warriors en lovers wherever I live, work en play in…..

Najua I ain’t jus lucky, I yam [en we are] blessed. For that en so much mo’ ai yam infinitely grateful for….

There’s a(nother) story I know. It’s about the earth and divine re/visions of rainbow nations in urban hubs na vijiji kama [villages like in]  Abuja, Addis Ababa, Brooklyn, Cape town, Cairo, Dar-es-salaam, Jo’burg, Kampala, Kigali, Kingston, Lagos, Nairobi, Rajasthan, Tdot, Tripoli [and wherever there are those spreading love, hope and positivity in abundance]……these are (some of) the  post-cards of Makmende’s adventures that I will remember tomorrow.

What is it?

A Photo Campaign in honor of David Kato’s life and legacy

(February 15,1964 – January 26, 2011)

Why should I care?

Because it is not going to get BETTER until all of our love can be celebrated openly

What can I do?

Join the Movement:To David, With Love” is about sending a message to our LGBTQ brothers and sisters in Afrika that we are watching, that we care and that we will not put up with their persecution any longer.

JOIN US: And make your sign or bring a sign with your personal message! We will photograph you and send your photo message to SMUG, for the QLGBT  community in Uganda.

 

Remember it is not going to get BETTER until all of our love can be celebrated openly

WHERE:

Women’s Health in Women’s Hands Community Health Centre

2 Carlton St, Suite 500 (near College Subway Station)

[Tdot]

WHEN:

Time: 6:00-8:30 pm

Tribute starts at 6:30PM sharp.

 

RSVP: humanwritesproject@rogers.com

Light refreshments

Sign-making materials will be provided

Bring your own markers, sparkles etc. to add that special touch….

A photo booth will be on site.

 

Sponsored by Black Queer Resistance ( BQR) & concerned LGBTQ citizens of Toronto.

The Petition

We the undersigned condemn in the strongest possible terms the murder of Mr David Kato the Ugandan gay rights campaigner. We wish to state emphatically that homosexuality is neither a sin nor a social or cultural construct. It is a biological given. Homosexuals are human beings like everybody else. Scientific research has been helpful in clearing the fog of ignorance entrenched by some religious texts in regards to homosexuality. Our opinions of homosexuality must change for the better just as our opinion of slavery has changed even though it was endorsed by those same religious texts. All violence against gays and people deemed to be gay in Africa must cease forthwith.

We call on the government of Uganda to find and prosecute all those involved in the murder of Mr Kato, including the newspaper that called for the hanging of gays. We also call on African governments to learn from the South African example by expunging from their laws all provisions that criminalize homosexuality or treat homosexuals as unworthy of the same rights and entitlements as other citizens. African states must protect the rights of their citizens to freedom and dignity. Homosexuals must not be denied these rights.

Undersigned:

1. Wale Adebanwi, PhD, University of California, US

2. Diran Adebayo, Writer, UK

3. Kayode Adeduntan, PhD, University of Ibadan, Nigeria

4. Biola Adegboyega, University of Calgary, Canada

5. Shola Adenekan, Editor, The New Black Magazine, UK

6. Pius Adesanmi, PhD, Carleton University, Canada

7. Akin Adesokan, PhD, Indiana University, US

8. Joe Agbro, Journalist, Nigeria

9. Anthony Akinola, PhD, Oxford, UK

10. Anengiyefa Alagoa, Writer, UK

11. Ellah Allfrey, Deputy Editor, Granta Magazine, UK

12. Alnoor Amlani, Writer, Kenya

13. Ike Anya, Public health doctor and writer, UK

14. Bode Asiyanbi, Writer, Lancaster University, UK

15. Sefi Atta, Writer, US

16. Lizzy Attree, PhD, University of East London, UK

17. Damola Awoyokun, Writer, UK

18. Doreen Baingana, Writer, Uganda

19. Igoni Barrett, Writer, Nigeria
20. Tom Burke, Bard College, US

21. Jude Dibia, Writer, Nigeria

22. Chris Dunton, PhD, National University of Lesotho, Lesotho

23. Ropo Ewenla, PhD, Obafemi Awolowo University, Nigeria

24. Chielozona Eze, PhD, Northeastern Illinois University, US

25. Aminatta Forna, Writer, UK

26. Ivor Hartmann, Writer, South Africa

27. Chris Ihidero, Writer, Lagos State University, Nigeria

28. Ikhide R. Ikheloa, Writer, US

29. Sean Jacobs, PhD, New School, US

30. Biodun Jeyifo, PhD, Harvard University, US

31. Brian Jones, Professor Emeritus, Zimbabwe

32. Martin Kiman, Writer, US

33. Lauri Kubuitsile, Writer, Botswana

34. Zakes Mda, PhD, Ohio University, US

35. Colin Meier, Writer, South Africa

36. Gayatri Menon, PhD, Franklin and Marshall College, US

37. Valentina A. Mmaka, Writer, Italy/South Africa

38. Jane Morris, Publisher, Zimbabwe

39. Mbonisi P. Ncube, Writer, South Africa

40. Iheoma Nwachukwu, Writer, Nigeria

41. Onyeka Nwelue, Writer and filmmaker, India/Nigeria

42. Nnedi Okorafor, PhD, Writer, Chicago State University, US

43. Ebenezer Obadare, PhD, University of Kansas, US

44. Juliane Okot Bitek, Writer, Canada

45. Tejumola Olaniyan, PhD, University of Wisconsin, US

46. Ngozichi Omekara, Trinidad and Tobago

47. Akin Omotosho, Actor and filmmaker, South Africa

48. Kole Omotosho, PhD, Africa Diaspora Research Group, South Africa

49. Samuel Sabo, Writer, UK

50. Ramzi Salti, PhD, Stanford University, US

51. Brett L. Shadle, PhD, Virginia Tech, US

52. Lola Shoneyin, Writer, Nigeria

53. Wole Soyinka, Nobel Laureate for Literature

54. Olufemi Taiwo, PhD, Seattle University, US

55. Kola Tubosun, Writer, Fulbright Scholar, United States

56. Uzor Maxim Uzoatu, Writer, Nigeria

57. Abdourahman A.Waberi, Writer, US /Djibouti

58. Binyavanga Wainaina, Writer, Kenya

59. Ronald Elly Wanda, Writer & Lecturer, Marcus Garvey Pan-Afrikan Institute, Uganda

60. Kristy Warren, PhD, University of Warwick, UK

61. Cornel West, Princeton University, US

[reposted from http://thingsifeelstronglyabout.blogspot.com/2011/02/writers-and-academics-against.html ]

give thanks for all those spreading love, hope, and positivity in abundance….bless them and their families, and all those around them….mo powah! to our unity 🙂

Day 4 – Ujamaa – 5th Annual Kwanzaa Celebration presented by The Village Project

Day 4: Wednesday, December 29th
Ujamaa (cooperative economics): to build and maintain our own stores, shops, and other businesses together.

The Village Project Presents

5th Annual Kwanzaa Celebration, 2010

“Uniting to Strengthen Our Families and Communities”

December 26, 2010 thru January 1, 2011

SAN FRANCISCO — The Village Project, in collaboration with the YMCA, MOEWD, SUPERVSIOR ROSS MIRKARIMI and other community organizations, presents its 5th Kwanzaa Celebration 2010 for the City of San Francisco. The celebration is seven days of free events throughout the city to celebrate the seven principles (Nguzo Saba) of Kwanzaa. There will be plenty of food & live entertainment, featuring the infamous blues & jazz vocalist, Lady Mem’fis and blues legend, Bobbie Spider Webb.

Created by Dr. Maulana Karenga in 1966, Kwanzaa is celebrated annually by more than 30 million people worldwide, over seven days from December 26 to January 1.

The values of Kwanzaa, Nguzo Saba, are critical tools for addressing the issues facing the African-American community. Adrian Williams has revived the celebration of Kwanzaa throughout San Francisco, by connecting traditionally African American communities for this celebration. She is the founder of The Village Project, a youth service organization focusing on education and cultural enrichment for youth and their families in the Western Addition.

The Seven Principles of Kwanzaa will be hosted at nine different venues throughout the City. Participating communities will present exciting and enriching cultural programs intended to both engage and entertain the entire family. The Community Partners of these events include: THE YMCA, THE MAYOR’S OFFICE OF ECONOMIC & WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT, MAYOR’S OFFICE OF NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICES, SUPERVISOR ROSS MIRKARIMI, COMCAST, RENAISSANCE PARENTS OF SUCCESS, WEST BAY CONFERENCE CENTER, GUSSIES CHICKEN & WAFFLES , WAFRC ,OMI FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER, MARCUS BOOKSTORE, AFRICAN AMERICAN HOLISTIC WELLNESS PROGRAM, SF BLACK FILM FESTIVAL, PLANET FILLMORE COMMUNICATIONS, MINNIE & LOVIE REC CENTER, BAYVIEW PUBLIC LIBRARY, AFRICAN AMERICAN ARTS AND CULTURE COMPLEX, THE JAZZ HERITAGE CENTER, YOSHI’S, MOMAGIC, THE MUSICIANS PROJECT, CHRISTINE HARRIS, MALIK SENEFENU, BROTHA CLINT, KWANZA MORTON, MEL SIMMONS & S.N.I.G.

When: December 26, 2010 thru January 1, 2011
Where: Throughout San Francisco
Tickets: No Charge event

Comcast Newsmakers: The Village Project Celebrates Kwanzaa in a New Decade – San Francisco Style

financial districts. jua kali industries.

Ujamaa (cooperative economics): to build and maintain our own stores, shops, and other businesses together.
Wednesday, December 29th,

1:00 pm, Buchanan YMCA/WAFRC, 1530 Buchanan;

 7 pm, Minnie & Lovie Rec Center, 650 Capitol Street:

Na kesho ni siku ya tano, ni ya hadithi ya Nia

 

[I,S.I.S note: reposted with big love en respekt, in the spirit of bredrin en dadas in solidarity]

http://transgriot.blogspot.com/2010/12/kwanzaa-black-trans-style-ujima.html

(Painfully copy and pasted because I knew Moya would appreciate it.)

Black women are having a moment. In fact, we had several in 2010—not always positive (think Proenza Schouler’s “Act Da Fool” short and Gabourey Sidibe’s subpar ELLE cover), but almost always insightful (Sesame Street’s “I Love My Hair” video).

Whether it left us shaking our heads in disdain or nodding in agreement, we, without a doubt, had some much-needed discussion (e.g., Madame Noire’s “8 Reasons to Date a White Man” article and Tyler Perry’s “For Colored Girls”) and mobilized in ways that we hadn’t for years (from Philly-based designer Shavonne Deann staging a guerrilla runway show, to the “Fashion In Action!” march in protest of the lack of Black fashion directors in the magazine industry—both during fashion week). It’s up to each and every one of us to keep the momentum going right into the next year … and beyond.

Here at CLUTCH, we’re issuing a public declaration of our rights, demands, and just shit we will not stand for anymore.

  • * We will tell our own stories. There is just something to be said about Black women directing movies about Black women or Black women conducting studies about our own struggles. Perhaps it’s authenticity. Instead of complaining when we see distorted representations of our experiences, we vow to seek positions of power and/or find ways to support other Black women to do so, so that we can write our own narratives—not men, not Whites, not anyone else.
  • * We will not rely on the Internet (or any other form of media) to be our relationship mediator. One of the main reasons that the viral videos and special news reports on the state of Black relationships hit such a nerve is not because they perpetuated stereotypes we already knew existed, but because we weren’t already having these conversations openly, honestly and constructively with one another (i.e., men with women).
  •  * We will feel safe in our neighborhoods. When did it become acceptable for us to be afraid to walk home after dark? When did we become naturalized to the random acts of violence committed against us each day? It is not okay. And we will no longer let another catcall or invasion of our personal space go unaddressed—whether it’s speaking up to the perpetrator or alerting the nearby authorities. 
  •  * We will remember that we are human. Contrary to popular belief, we are not the mules of the world. We are not superhuman. We will allow our selves to hurt, so long as we allow ourselves to heal.
  •  * We will whip our hair. No matter if it’s long, short, permed, natural, or weaved, we will nurture what’s underneath. We will not pit women against each other because of our hair preferences. Hair is like religion. We each have our own rituals. We vow to respect each other’s rituals.
  •  * We will open our minds and hearts to love. We will embrace the possibility of finding a mate who is outside of our race, income bracket or height range. We will remember that these attributes are not measures of one’s character or compatibility.
  • * We will love ourselves and each other. We pledge to speak positivity into our lives and the lives of others. We will mentor other Black women and uplift them. We promise to acknowledge other women with a smile or a simple “hello” … and mean it. Sisterhood is essential for our survival.

(Source: clutchmagonline.com)

I,sista in solidarity note: ‘virtual’ communities of practice are going ‘viral’ with resistance, renewal and positivity….

You will not be able to stay home, brother.
You will not be able to plug in, turn on and cop out.
You will not be able to lose yourself on skag and skip,
Skip out for beer during commercials,
Because the revolution will not be televised.

The revolution will not be televised.
The revolution will not be brought to you by Xerox
In 4 parts without commercial interruptions.
The revolution will not show you pictures of Nixon
blowing a bugle and leading a charge by John
Mitchell, General Abrams and Spiro Agnew to eat
hog maws confiscated from a Harlem sanctuary.

The revolution will not be televised.
The revolution will not be brought to you by the
Schaefer Award Theatre and will not star Natalie
Woods and Steve McQueen or Bullwinkle and Julia.
The revolution will not give your mouth sex appeal.
The revolution will not get rid of the nubs.
The revolution will not make you look five pounds
thinner, because the revolution will not be televised, Brother.

There will be no pictures of you and Willie May
pushing that shopping cart down the block on the dead run,
or trying to slide that color television into a stolen ambulance.
NBC will not be able predict the winner at 8:32 
or report from 29 districts.
The revolution will not be televised.

There will be no pictures of pigs shooting down
brothers in the instant replay.
There will be no pictures of pigs shooting down
brothers in the instant replay.
There will be no pictures of Whitney Young being
run out of Harlem on a rail with a brand new process.
There will be no slow motion or still life of Roy
Wilkens strolling through Watts in a Red, Black and
Green liberation jumpsuit that he had been saving
For just the proper occasion.

Green Acres, The Beverly Hillbillies, and Hooterville
Junction will no longer be so damned relevant, and
women will not care if Dick finally gets down with
Jane on Search for Tomorrow because Black people
will be in the street looking for a brighter day.
The revolution will not be televised.

There will be no highlights on the eleven o’clock
news and no pictures of hairy armed women
liberationists and Jackie Onassis blowing her nose.
The theme song will not be written by Jim Webb,
Francis Scott Key, nor sung by Glen Campbell, Tom
Jones, Johnny Cash, Englebert Humperdink, or the Rare Earth.
The revolution will not be televised.

The revolution will not be right back
after a message about a white tornado, white lightning, or white people.
You will not have to worry about a dove in your
bedroom, a tiger in your tank, or the giant in your toilet bowl.
The revolution will not go better with Coke.
The revolution will not fight the germs that may cause bad breath.
The revolution will put you in the driver’s seat.

The revolution will not be televised, will not be televised,
will not be televised, will not be televised.
The revolution will be no re-run brothers;
The revolution will be live.

-Gil Scott-Heron, 1971

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http://memoirsofjeang.tumblr.com/post/2334483534