The bigger point of sharing these videos is to highlight the police brutality and targeting of peaceful protesters, in the thousands, and who continue to wo/man the frontlines of working for justice and peace.

Pictures of the burning cop car & ‘violent’ protesters vandalising property circulated the world yesterday while Tdot’s Robocops have arrested six hundred and counting & continue to maintain a lockdown in many parts of the cities

Bredrin en sistren gathered to fight for different causes, all united by our common resistance to the G20  summit, reminding our (in) glorious leaders that most people would not have had our government waste a billion dollars in a summit that has not only failed (read: refused) to re/dress our most critical challenges yet, but that legislated the transformation of downtown Toronto into an armed fortress, where the police state that we live in was most visible with the excessive violence used by mostly  robocops

[ youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7KAQKmKjRwU&feature=related]

http://news.nationalpost.com/2010/06/27/12572/

To make it plain, this is illegal fuckery that we cannot ignore and the government seriously needs to be taken to task now by more of us people, for sanctioning the measures used by the police to violate our human rights…..

http://movementdefence.org/G20appeal

The MDC’s Summit Legal Support Project is appealing to the movements it supports to mobilize a show of political strength and solidarity for the nearly 500 [or 600] people arrested in the last four days. The Toronto Police and the ISU appear to have lost control of their ‘prisoner processing center’, denying arrestees meaningful and timely access to counsel while beating and arresting those peacefully protesting their detention outside.

Despite assurances to the contrary, only a handful of people have been released, including those held for many hours without charge. Arrestees are given incorrect information about the bail process they will be subjected to, and friends and family members gather hours early at the courthouse, located far from the city center and inaccessible via transit. Our lawyers call in and are told that there is no one available to make decisions or wait for hours at the detention centre, only to be denied access to their clients. Almost 500 people are in custody and we know from experience that the vast majority of those charges will disappear and yet the cell doors remain shut.

We need to step it up and build a political response. We need many more voices – especially prominent ones – to say that the abuse and incompetence at 629 Eastern Avenue must stop. We must demand that all levels of government take control of the police forces under their command. We need to ensure that courts and crown attorneys act to enforce constitutional rights rather than collude in their violation.

Free the Toronto 600!

The Movement Defence Committee

This solidarity with those illegally jailed has been growing and going on despite vicious repression….and for native people, for poor & working class people, for so many “minorities”, like another sista said…”this is what we know, this is Canada”

http://toronto.mediacoop.ca/story/outside-makeshift-prisonfor-us-native-people-what-we-know-canada/3895

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KAMPALA, Uganda — Last March, three American evangelical Christians, whose teachings about “curing” homosexuals have been widely discredited in the United States, arrived here in Uganda’s capital to give a series of talks.

Marc Hofer for The New York Times

Nikki Mawanda, 27, who was born female but lives as a “trans-man” in Uganda, described abuse by the police and others

Daniel, Washington

The theme of the event, according to Stephen Langa, its Ugandan organizer, was “the gay agenda — that whole hidden and dark agenda” — and the threat homosexuals posed to Bible-based values and the traditional African family.

For three days, according to participants and audio recordings, thousands of Ugandans, including police officers, teachers and national politicians, listened raptly to the Americans, who were presented as experts on homosexuality. The visitors discussed how to make gay people straight, how gay men often sodomized teenage boys and how “the gay movement is an evil institution” whose goal is “to defeat the marriage-based society and replace it with a culture of sexual promiscuity.”

Now the three Americans are finding themselves on the defensive, saying they had no intention of helping stoke the kind of anger that could lead to what came next: a bill to impose a death sentence for homosexual behavior.

One month after the conference, a previously unknown Ugandan politician, who boasts of having evangelical friends in the American government, introduced the Anti-Homosexuality Bill of 2009, which threatens to hang homosexuals, and, as a result, has put Uganda on a collision course with Western nations.

Donor countries, including the United States, are demanding that Uganda’s government drop the proposed law, saying it violates human rights, though Uganda’s minister of ethics and integrity (who previously tried to ban miniskirts) recently said, “Homosexuals can forget about human rights.”

The Ugandan government, facing the prospect of losing millions in foreign aid, is now indicating that it will back down, slightly, and change the death penalty provision to life in prison for some homosexuals. But the battle is far from over.

Instead, Uganda seems to have become a far-flung front line in the American culture wars, with American groups on both sides, the Christian right and gay activists, pouring in support and money as they get involved in the broader debate over homosexuality in Africa.

“It’s a fight for their lives,” said Mai Kiang, a director at the Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice, a New York-based group that has channeled nearly $75,000 to Ugandan gay rights activists and expects that amount to grow.

The three Americans who spoke at the conference — Scott Lively, a missionary who has written several books against homosexuality, including “7 Steps to Recruit-Proof Your Child”; Caleb Lee Brundidge, a self-described former gay man who leads “healing seminars”; and Don Schmierer, a board member of Exodus International, whose mission is “mobilizing the body of Christ to minister grace and truth to a world impacted by homosexuality” — are now trying to distance themselves from the bill.

“I feel duped,” Mr. Schmierer said, arguing that he had been invited to speak on “parenting skills” for families with gay children. He acknowledged telling audiences how homosexuals could be converted into heterosexuals, but he said he had no idea some Ugandans were contemplating the death penalty for homosexuality.

“That’s horrible, absolutely horrible,” he said. “Some of the nicest people I have ever met are gay people.”

Mr. Lively and Mr. Brundidge have made similar remarks in interviews or statements issued by their organizations. But the Ugandan organizers of the conference admit helping draft the bill, and Mr. Lively has acknowledged meeting with Ugandan lawmakers to discuss it. He even wrote on his blog in March that someone had likened their campaign to “a nuclear bomb against the gay agenda in Uganda.” Later, when confronted with criticism, Mr. Lively said he was very disappointed that the legislation was so harsh.

Human rights advocates in Uganda say the visit by the three Americans helped set in motion what could be a very dangerous cycle. Gay Ugandans already describe a world of beatings, blackmail, death threats like “Die Sodomite!” scrawled on their homes, constant harassment and even so-called correctional rape.

“Now we really have to go undercover,” said Stosh Mugisha, a gay rights activist who said she was pinned down in a guava orchard and raped by a farmhand who wanted to cure her of her attraction to girls. She said that she was impregnated and infected with H.I.V., but that her grandmother’s reaction was simply, “ ‘You are too stubborn.’ ”

Despite such attacks, many gay men and lesbians here said things had been getting better for them before the bill, at least enough to hold news conferences and publicly advocate for their rights. Now they worry that the bill could encourage lynchings. Already, mobs beat people to death for infractions as minor as stealing shoes.

“What these people have done is set the fire they can’t quench,” said the Rev. Kapya Kaoma, a Zambian who went undercover for six months to chronicle the relationship between the African anti-homosexual movement and American evangelicals.

Mr. Kaoma was at the conference and said that the three Americans “underestimated the homophobia in Uganda” and “what it means to Africans when you speak about a certain group trying to destroy their children and their families.”

“When you speak like that,” he said, “Africans will fight to the death.”

Uganda is an exceptionally lush, mostly rural country where conservative Christian groups wield enormous influence. This is, after all, the land of proposed virginity scholarships, songs about Jesus playing in the airport, “Uganda is Blessed” bumper stickers on Parliament office doors and a suggestion by the president’s wife that a virginity census could be a way to fight AIDS.

During the Bush administration, American officials praised Uganda’s family-values policies and steered millions of dollars into abstinence programs.

Uganda has also become a magnet for American evangelical groups. Some of the best known Christian personalities have recently passed through here, often bringing with them anti-homosexuality messages, including the Rev. Rick Warren, who visited in 2008 and has compared homosexuality to pedophilia. (Mr. Warren recently condemned the anti-homosexuality bill, seeking to correct what he called “lies and errors and false reports” that he played a role in it.)

Many Africans view homosexuality as an immoral Western import, and the continent is full of harsh homophobic laws. In northern Nigeria, gay men can face death by stoning. Beyond Africa, a handful of Muslim countries, like Iran and Yemen, also have the death penalty for homosexuals. But many Ugandans said they thought that was going too far. A few even spoke out in support of gay people.

“I can defend them,” said Haj Medih, a Muslim taxi driver with many homosexual customers. “But I fear the what? The police, the government. They can arrest you and put you in the safe house, and for me, I don’t have any lawyer who can help me.”

 

Demonstrators carried banners denouncing homosexuality in December in Kampala, Uganda.

Marc Hofer for The New York Times

Marc Hofer for The New York Times

Stosh Mugisha is going through a transition to become a man.

Readers’ Comments

“I don’t think any of them were duped by those in Uganda. When you preach a gospel of hatred do you expect love to blossom?”

So here’s yet another repost…another in/direct relay of the shit that our east afrikan “media” personalities spew….as with everything else nowadays,we ain’t agonising, so much as, using this homo & trans phobic backlash to organise ourselves & advocate for queer/trans rights.

in other words, we’re  TAKING BACK SPACE!carolinemutoko1

you’re right Caroline, we have much more important shit to deal with. I resent that folks like you, who getting paid plenty nuff to get people’s attention and sell stuff, that you would waste airtime with such ignorance and (mis) understanding, that you would trigger me to JUS HAVTA  respond

……tolerance is not equated with sticking your head in the sand or allowing for hate to flourish. I told this to John Allan Namu, and I’ll tell this to you, sometimes you just need to go by a really simple rule of thumb. if you don’t have anything good to say, then don’t say nothing at all. (and yes, that one is another tricky principle to negotiate…but I’ll show you an example of the power there is in language….I’mm check you, en still keep it positive….practise long enough and you can do it too)

both you (en John Allan Namu) need to sign up for our upcoming AO101  workshops. If like you say, Caroline, there are so many  “gay” folk that you support, and kudos for trying, then I’m sure you would jump at the chance of educating yourself on anti-oppression issues.

we all gots learning to do. and this will be my gift to you. I offer you a 2 – 3hr workshop, for you and your colleagues in March…at your convenience, where we will challenge homo/les/bi/trans phobia in a decolonization framework.

In other words, we’ll interrogate the intersections of our diversity and oppressions, and teach you more appropriate words than gay, like queer, & ” so gay” like neo colonialism & the masters tools will never dismantle the master’s house……and you can learn more about the role of allies, and all those folks in the closet…..most importantly, you’ll hear from people who’re OUT  of the closet, and won’t take you shoving us back inside…relegating us to sensationalist news items on the latest western craze and 2 gay men getting married in the  UK.

and dear reader, this post is for you too,  judge for yourself if Caroline needs any checking on her “issues”..

here’s what she had to say, in her own words.

stefanbruggermannwordsthatbecompics

THIS IS WHAT CAROLINE MUTOKO OF KISS FM wrote last week concerning an issue that was raised by many listeners of their sister station- CLASSIC 105 when the on air presenters went on and on poking fun at the gay community and concluding by telling their listerners to SLAP THE GAYNESS out of any gay person they meet in Kenya…………………..

*The violence in Kenya in 2007 can never be compared to the intolerance Kenya and Africa have for gay people. It trivializes the issues we underwent politically and ethically. The very people who suffered in 2007 would be shocked and disgusted to think some small minded people think it’s the same thing. How you chose to have sex cannot and does not compare to the suffering of our IDPS.*

*I am tolerant of homosexuals, period. When I start getting garbage in the name of the “persecuted minorities” then I have to put an end to it. There’s a threshold to how tolerant I or anyone can be of something that whether you like it or not, goes against the very sensibilities of more than 90% of humanity, let alone Kenyans.*

No single media personality has given the homosexuals in this country more air-time or space to speak and be heard without judging them than I have. So spare me the crap and the moral high-ground on what I can or cannot say and whether or not Nick and Marcus were right or wrong. There are homosexuals who work with us how do you want to know I care? Would you like to me “out” them so you can ask them if Caroline is legitimate.

What Kenya went through in early 2008 and this nonsense with the homosexuals cannot and should not be compared at all. How fickle can you be.

I can be tolerant, and tolerant I am, but I don’t have to embrace it and I sure as hell don’t have to apologise for saying it’s a none issue if I think so. There are bigger issues in this nation to deal with right now and the fact that afew homosexuals are hurt because Marcus and Nick said, give them a quick slap is beyond logic.

(NO SHE DI(UH)N!!!!!!)

From [*Name*], to [*Name*], to [*Name*], [*Name*], the organisation called Forgotten Sheep, [*Name*], [*Name*], [*Name*], to [*Name*] and [*Name*], to [*Name*] and [*Name*], to [*Name*] and [*Name*] and not to mention [*Name*] and [*Name*] who still rely on me for cash and jobs, I am very tolerant of homosexuals in Kenya. I’m not some silly little talking head looking for cheap publicity, I actually keep their confidences, respect their secrets and accept they want to remain in the closet.

(Yes! This is ironically THE  Harvey milk moment of this rant)

They come to my show, call me and take me into confidence because they know I get it. I’m their go-to-person. But when some air-heads thinks this is their new soap box to get mileage, you’ve got another think coming.

Incidentally, can you all get back to work, Paul Ilado, Patrick Quarcoo and myself have real issues to deal with. Caroline.

PS- SHE HAS WRITTEN ANOTHER LONG ARTICLE TITLED-  SO YOU’RE GAY, SO WHAT????

in todays THE STAR newspaper…..

does it have to be this way?here’s the blog discovery of the day, forwarded from a/nother MWA  dada. ase m’khana.

below is, michael mumo on the issue of the (heavy) backlash against queer/trans afrikan communities in recent times.

watch this blog for the delayed reaction.kesho.

This is one of those blogs that I know will provoke derision but I will throw prudence out of the window and write it nonetheless.

I’ve quietly been following debate on the gay partnership between two consenting Kenyan adults in the UK over the past few days and feel compelled to say the following;

The Kenyan media has unfairly demonised occupants of a homestead in Murang’a over the sexual orientation of one of their own who has chosen a particular (or is it odd?) lifestyle.

What moral authority does the media hold to dictate what is correct or incorrect in society?  Haven’t they told us that one man’s meat may be another man’s poison?

For a start, the civil union was conducted in the UK where the act is legal.As such, the couple has not committed any crime.  They did not cement the union here in Kenya where such an act is still unlawful.

Let me pose this… If you were to count the number of thieves sitting in the so-called Grand Coalition government you’d fall asleep before you’re done.Why haven’t we made it a big deal as we have this particular gay saga?

Why haven’t I seen the media troop to the homes of those politicians to demand to know from their mothers if they know their sons and daughters are crooks? I think I have the answer…  It’s because it is not the business of my folks to determine what I decide to do once I turn 18.It is also none of your business! 

If our TV crews expended so much energy on the moral high ground as we did on this story, then we would have changed Kenya for the better decades ago.

We should leave Charles Ngengi and his ‘bride’ Daniel Chege Gichia to enjoy their honeymoon on the sunny beaches of Brighton in the south of the UK. They are roughly 7,000 kilometers away from us and their partnership is unlikely to influence our way of life.

For what it’s worth, theirs would have been a quiet union had it not been for the prying media who intruded our quiet ‘moral’ lifestyles, which they have now ‘polluted’ with ‘normal’ goings on in a part of North London.

We should accept divergent orientations and views, especially if they do not affect you and pose no risk. This world is not about what you imagine to be right or wrong – right according to whom?  What you imagine is right may be wrong according to someone in Islington – or Kawangware for that matter.

There! I’ve said it.  Bring on the affection or hate.

For the record; I’m not anywhere near gay.

 

here’s an action alert for those  in TDot…..

we’re putting more political issues back into our partying….

 

come OUT  to GRANNY BOOTS next week @ the GladStone Hotel.

for the launch of  S.I.S (Sistas in Solidarity), a coalition of folks in Tdot,

organising ourselves to support queer/trans rights on the continent.

 

And we’re recruiting folks for a QPOC activists list serv, hosted by Fahamu, to share resources and build solidarity within queer/trans (pan) afrikan communities.

join us for a night of film screenings, spoken werd & dance.

and stay for the after party, with Swagger & Fresh To Def.

consider this  PROTEST/BAHATI,  a gift exchange party 🙂

all comrades, friends and allies are welcome!

 

 

……what you don’t know, you’re a victim too, Mr. Jailer….

eudy2a word from the blogger: I’m re/posting this because I think Patrick is talking about some important strategies…for the West. I’m not advocating for east afrikan queers & trannies to go out onto the streets and hold hands (jus yet) because I fear it’d be putting people in needless danger.

What I would strongly urge though is for queers & trannies in Canada, the U.K, the States….. to organise protests in solidarity with east afrikan communities. These past few weeks have been filled with backlash.

Uganda. Bill 18. Rwanda. Article 217. Kenya. 2 gay men were arrested in Mombasa & 2 lesbians were arrested in Kisumu… more on that in the following posts…

repost: Patrick Strudwick, The Guardian UK, Tuesday October 20th

I came out of the closet when I was 14, but rarely have I held another man’s hand in public. I’m a pragmatist. The feeling of cosy belonging might be delightful in theory, but as a gay person, it’s not that simple – it necessitates a constant risk assessment of one’s surroundings.

Which may explain why my hands are sweating. I’m standing outside The George and Dragon, a gay pub on east London‘s Hackney Road, waiting to meet a man who has agreed to walk hand in hand with me. You might think that these days people would barely notice. But things have changed. We’re in the midst of a new wave of anti-gay hate crimes: since April there has been a 14% rise nationwide in attacks on gay people. There were four homophobic murders in London last year; last week Ian Baynham died a fortnight after being attacked in Trafalgar Square. In summer mobs of youths besieged gay bars in east London. And, just a few metres from where I’m standing, a 21-year-old man was left paralysed last year after a gang stabbed him repeatedly. Gay people are getting scared. I’m scared.

The man I’m meeting is Dave Atkins, the mercifully tall and broad founder of A Day in Hand, an organisation dedicated to encouraging gay people to hold hands in public. “You have to go out and do it,” he booms. “It’s the only way things will change.”

He grabs my hand. We pass an elderly woman who stares straight ahead. Next come a couple in their 30s with two young children. They seem incomprehensibly absorbed in what their toddler is doing. A man saunters by. He clocks our clasped hands before looking away. Was that a hostile look?

“Let’s go up here,” I say, leading Dave into the Boundary estate where those mobs are rumoured to have come from. We pass a group of youths. They appear to find their iPhones more compelling than the sight of two interlocked homosexuals. At Whitechapel market a pair of bargain hunters glance first at us, down at our hands, and back to the two-for-ones.

Then something shocking happens. We turn into a quiet side street. Dave and I are engrossed in our conversation. Suddenly I jolt with the realisation that I have forgotten we are holding hands. “That’s the Holy Grail,” says Dave, “being so comfortable you don’t even think about it.”

We head into the West End and provoke nothing more than a cursory glance. Our final destination is Trafalgar Square. Last month, Ian Baynham, 62, was kicked to death here. There’s a din coming from somewhere – a man is on the first ridge of Nelson’s column preaching the message of the ‘Good Book’. “Let’s climb up next to him!” I cry. The sight of a preacher on Nelson’s column with two gay men holding hands next to him is starting to draw crowds. A lesbian couple spot us, scramble up and join our silent show of defiance. “The Lord will save you,” says the preacher. He didn’t save Ian Baynham, I think.

“I’m genuinely surprised,” I tell Dave afterwards as we say our goodbyes. “I was expecting at least some nasty comments.” “You see?” he replies, beaming.

But I know that today I was lucky; that at night things could have been different.

global human rights

to learn how to give love and to let it come in.

 in the spirit of love en resistance,

here’s another gift (yes yes y’all! tis’ the giving season)

more s/heroes waxing LIBERATORY  about  OUR  stories.

iS.I.S: you are beautiful